Sutta Pitaka
Samyutta Nikàya
Volume IV Ý Saëàyatanavaggo
Samyutta 34 Ý Saëàyatana Saüyutta
Chapter 11 Ý Yogakkhemi Vaggo

34. 11. 1.
(104) Yogakkhemi Ý Freedom from Bonds

1. At Sàvatthi:

2. ßMonks, I will teach you the method, to gain freedom from the bonds. Listen carefully to it.

3. Monks, what is the method to gain freedom from the bonds?

4Ý8. Monks, the monk sees agreeable, welcome forms cognizable by eye-consciousness, which arouses sensual desires and promotes attachments. The Thus Gone One has dispelled them, pulled them with the roots, made them palm stumps, made them not grow again and declares freedom from them. Therefore it is said the Thus Gone One is free from bonds.û

Repeat for agreeable welcome sounds, agreeable welcome scents, agreeable welcome savories and agreeable welcome touches.

9. Monks, the monk cognizes agreeable, welcome ideas cognizable by mind-consciousness, which arouses sensual desires and promotes attachments The Thus Gone One has dispelled them, pulled them with the roots, made them palm stumps and made them not grow again and declares freedom from them. Therefore it is said the Thus Gone One is free from bonds.

10. Monks, this is the method to gain freedom from bonds.û

34. 11. 2.
(105) Upàdàya Ý On account of

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha and addressed the monks from there:

2. ßMonks, when what is present and on account of what arises pleasant and unpleasant feelings to the monk?û

3. ßVenerable sir, it is the Blessed One's leading to the Teaching. The monks will hear it from the Blessed One and bear it in their minds.û

4. ßMonks, when conscious of the eye and relying on it, arises pleasant and unpleasant feelingsû

Repeat for the ear, nose, tongue and the body.

ßMonks when mentally conscious relying on it, arise pleasant and unpleasant feelings.

5. Monks, is the eye permanent or impermanent?û

ßVenerable sir, it is impermanentû

ßThat impermanent thing is it unpleasant or pleasant?û

ßVenerable sir, it is unpleasantû

ßMonks, without clinging to that impermanent, unpleasant, changing thing, would pleasant and unpleasant feelings arise to you?û

ßNo, venerable sir, that is not so.û

6. Monks, is the ear permanent or impermanent?û Repeat.

7. Monks, is the nose permanent or impermanent?û Repeat.

8Ý9. Monks, is the tongue permanent or impermanent?û

Repeat for the body.

10. Monks, is the mind permanent or impermanent?û

ßVenerable sir, it is impermanentû

ßThat impermanent thing is it unpleasant or pleasant?û

ßVenerable sir, it is unpleasantû

ßMonks, without clinging to that impermanent, unpleasant, changing thing, would pleasant and unpleasant feelings arise to you?û

ßNo, venerable sir, that is not so.û

11. Monks, the learned noble disciple seeing this, turns from the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and the mind. Turning loses interest and is released. When released knowledge arises to him, birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end, duties are done, I do not have any other wishes!û

34. 11. 3.
(106) Dukkha Ý Unpleasantness

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha and addressed the monks from there:

2. ßMonks, I will teach the arising and fading of unpleasantness. Listen to it carefully.

3. ßMonks, what is the arising of unpleasantness?

4Ý9. ßOn account of eye and forms arise eye-consciousness. The co-incident arising of these three is contact. On account of a contact are feelings and on account of feelings craving. This is the arising of unpleasantness.û

Repeat for the ear, nose, tongue, body.

ßOn account of the mind and ideas arise mind-consciousness. The co-incident arising of these three is contact. On account of a contact are feelings. On account of feelings is craving. This is the arising of unpleasantness.

10. ßMonks, what is the fading of unpleasantness?

11. ßOn account of eye and forms arise eye-consciousness. The co-incident arising of these three is contact. On account of a contact are feelings. On account of feelings, craving. The losing of interest and ceasing of craving without anything remaining is the cessation of being. The cessation of being is the cessation of birth. The cessation of birth is the cessation of decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus is the cessation of the complete mass of unpleasantness.û

12Ý13. Repeat for ear and sounds and nose and scents.

14Ý15. Repeat above for the tongue and savories and the body and touches.

16. ßOn account of mind and ideas arise mind-consciousness. The co-incident arising of these three is contact. On account of a contact are feelings. On account of feelings is craving. The losing of interest and ceasing of craving without anything remaining is the cessation of being. The cessation of being is the cessation of birth. The cessation of birth is the cessation of decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus is the cessation of the complete mass of unpleasantness.û

34. 11. 4.
(107) Loko Ý The World

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha and addressed the monks from there:

2. ßMonks, I will teach the arising and fading of the world. Listen to it carefully.

3. ßMonks, what is the arising of the world?

4. ßOn account of eye and forms arise eye-consciousness. The co-incident arising of these three is contact. On account of a contact are feelings. On account of feelings is craving. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth is decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress thus is the arising of the world.

5Ý8. ßRepeat for ear and sounds, nose and scents, tongue and savories and body and touches.

9. ßOn account of mind and ideas arise mind-consciousness. The co-incident arising of these three is contact. On account of a contact are feelings. On account of feelings is craving. On account of craving is holding. On account of holding is being. On account of being is birth. On account of birth is decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress, this is the arising of the world.

10. ßMonks, what is the fading of the world?

11Ý16. ßOn account of eye and forms arise eye-consciousness. The co-incident arising of these three is contact. On account of a contact are feelings. On account of feelings is craving. The losing of interest and ceasing of craving without anything remaining is the cessation of holding. The cessation of holding is the cessation of being. The cessation of being is the cessation of birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress.û

Repeat for the other five.

Thus is the cessation of the complete mass of unpleasantness.

17. ßMonks this is the fading of the world.û

34. 11. 5.
(108) Seyyo I Ý I Am Superior

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha and addressed the monks from there:

2. ßMonks, when what is present, holding and settling in what, does it occur `I am superior, equal or inferior.'û

3. ßVenerable sir, the leading to the Teaching is from the Blessed One, the monks will learn it from the Blessed One and bear it in their minds.û

4Ý9. ßMonks, when the eye is present, on account of the eye and settling in the eye it occurs, `I am superior, or I am equal, or I am inferior.'

Repeat for the ear, nose, tongue, body.

ßWhen the mind is present, on account of the mind and settling in the mind it occurs, `I am superior, or I am equal, or I am inferior'

10. ßMonks, is the eye permanent or impermanent?û

ßVenerable sir, it is impermanentû

ßThat impermanent thing is it unpleasant or pleasant?û

ßVenerable sir, it is unpleasantû

ßMonks, without clinging to that impermanent, unpleasant, changing thing, would it occur to you `I am superior, or I am equal, or I am inferior'?û

ßNo, venerable sir, that is not so.û

11. Monks, is the ear permanent or impermanent?û Repeat.

12. Monks, is the nose permanent or impermanent?û Repeat.

13. Monks, is the tongue permanent or impermanent?û

14. Monks is the body permanent or impermanent?û

15. Monks, is the mind permanent or impermanent?û

ßVenerable sir, it is impermanentû

ßThat impermanent thing is it unpleasant or pleasant?û

ßVenerable sir, it is unpleasantû

ßMonks, without clinging to that impermanent, unpleasant, changing thing, would it occur to you `I am superior, or I am equal, or I am inferior'?û

ßNo, venerable sir, that is not so.û

11. Monks, the learned noble disciple seeing this, turns from the eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and the mind. Turning loses interest and is released. When released knowledge arises to him, birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end, duties are done, I do not wish anything more.û

34. 11. 6.
(109) Saüyojana Ý Bonds

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha and addressed the monks from there:

2. ßMonks, I will teach the binding things and the bonds, listen to it carefully

3. ßMonks, what are the binding things and what are the bonds?

4Ý9. ßMonks, the eye is a binding thing and whatever interest and greed for it, is the bond there.û

Repeat for the ear, nose, tongue, body.

ßThe mind is a binding thing and whatever interest and greed for it is the bond there.

10. ßMonks, these are the binding things and these are the bonds.û

34. 11. 7.
(110) Upadanam Ý Holding

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha and addressed the monks from there:

2. ßMonks, I will teach the holding things and how it is held, listen to it carefully

3. ßMonks, what are the holding things and how is the holding?

4Ý9. ßMonks, the eye is a holding thing and the holding is with interest and greed.û

Repeat for the ear, nose, tongue, and body.

The mind is a holding thing and the holding is with interest and greed.

10. ßMonks, these are the holding things and the holding.û

34. 11. 8.
(111) Pajanaü 1 Ý Thorough Knowledge 1

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha and addressed the monks from there:

2Ý7. ßMonks, it is not possible to destroy unpleasantness, other than by accurately and thoroughly comprehending the eye and experiencing, estranging and dispelling it.û

Repeat for the ear, nose, tongue, and body.

ßMonks, it is not possible to destroy unpleasantness, other than by accurately and thoroughly comprehending the mind and experiencing, estranging and dispelling it.

8Ý13. ßMonks, it is possible to destroy unpleasantness by accurately and thoroughly comprehending the eye and experiencing, estranging and dispelling it.û

Repeat for the ear, nose, tongue, and body.

ßMonks, it is possible to destroy unpleasantness by accurately and thoroughly comprehending the mind and experiencing, estranging and dispelling it.û

34. 11. 9.
(112) Pajanaü 2 Ý Thorough Knowledge 2

2Ý7. ßMonks, it is not possible to destroy unpleasantness other than by accurately and thoroughly comprehending forms and experiencing, estranging and dispelling them.û

Repeat for sounds, scents, savories, and touches. Monks, it is not possible to destroy unpleasantness, other than by accurately and thoroughly comprehending ideas and experiencing, estranging and dispelling them.

8Ý13. ßMonks, it is possible to destroy unpleasantness, by accurately and thoroughly comprehending forms and experiencing, estranging and dispelling them.û

Repeat for sounds, scents, savories, touches.

ßMonks, it is possible to destroy unpleasantness by accurately and thoroughly comprehending ideas and experiencing, estranging and dispelling them.û

34. 11. 10.
(113) Upassuti Ý Within Hearing

1. At one time the Blessed One was living with his relations in a house of bricks

2. At that time the Blessed One repeated this discourse to himself.

3. ßOn account of eye and forms arise eye-consciousness. The co-incident arising of these three is contact. On account of a contact are feelings. On account of feelings, craving. This is the arising of the complete mass of unpleasantness.

4Ý7. Repeat for the ear, nose, tongue and the body.

8. ßOn account of the mind and ideas arise mind-consciousness. The co-incident arising of these three is contact. On account of a contact are feelings. On account of feelings, craving. This is the arising of the complete mass of unpleasantness.

9. ßOn account of eye and forms arise eye-consciousness. The co-incident arising of these three is contact. On account of a contact are feelings. On account of feelings is craving. The losing of interest and cessation of craving without anything remaining is the cessation of being. The cessation of being is the cessation of birth. The cessation of birth is the cessation of decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus is the cessation of the complete mass of unpleasantness.

10Ý13. Repeat for the ear and sounds, nose and scents, tongue and savories, and body and touches.

14. ßOn account of mind and ideas arise mind-consciousness. The co-incident arising of these three is contact. On account of a contact are feelings and on account of feelings is craving. The losing of interest and cessation of craving without anything remaining is the cessation of being. The cessation of being is the cessation of birth. The cessation of birth is the cessation of decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. Thus is the cessation of the complete mass of unpleasantness.'

15. At that time a certain monk heard this discourse of the Blessed One.

16. The Blessed One saw that monk, standing close by.

17. Seeing said to that monk: ßMonk, did you hear this discourse?û ßYes, I did, venerable sir.û

ßMonk, learn this discourse! Monk, master this discourse and bear it in your mind! Monk, this discourse is full of meaning and it contains the fundamentals of the holy life!û