Sutta Pitaka
Samyutta Nikàya
Volume IV Ý Saëàyatanavaggo
Samyutta 35 Ý Vedanà Saüyutta
Chapter 3 Ý Aññhasatapariyàya Vaggo

35. 3. 1.
(21) Sãvaka Ý The Wandering Ascetic Moliya Sãvaka

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

2. The wandering ascetic Moliya Sãvaka approached the Blessed One exchanged friendly greetings and sat on a side.

3. Sitting on a side, the wandering ascetic Moliya Sãvaka said to the Blessed One: ßGood Gotama, there are some recluses and Brahmins, who hold this view and declare it, `whatever this person feels whether pleasant, unpleasant or neither unpleasant nor pleasant, all that is on account of actions done earlier,' what has good Gotama to say about this?û

4. ßSãvaka, certain feelings arise on account of bile, one himself knows about the fact that certain feelings arise on account of bile, all the world knows the fact that certain feelings arise on account of bile. Sãvaka, the recluses and Brahmins, who hold this view and declare it, `whatever this person feels whether pleasant, unpleasant or neither unpleasant nor pleasant, all that is on account of actions done earlier, say it ignoring something that they themselves know quite well and they ignore a fact that the whole world accepts, as the truth. Therefore I say this is a wrong view of those recluses and Brahmins.

5. ßSãvaka, certain feelings arise on account of phlegm,  re 

6. ßSãvaka, certain feelings arise on account of air,  re 

7. ßSãvaka, certain feelings arise on account of the above three acting together,  re 

8. ßSãvaka, certain feelings arise on account of the change of seasons,  re 

9. ßSãvaka, certain feelings arise on account of unusual activity,  re 

10. ßSãvaka, certain feelings arise on account of sudden attacks,  re 

11. ßSãvaka, and certain feelings arise on account actions done earlier, one himself knows about the fact that certain feelings arise on account of actions done earlier, all the world knows the fact that certain feelings arise on account of actions done earlier. Sãvaka, the recluses and Brahmins, who hold this view and declare it, `whatever this person feels whether pleasant, unpleasant or neither unpleasant nor pleasant, all that is on account of actions done earlier, say it ignoring something that they themselves know quite well and they ignore a fact that the whole world accepts, as the truth. Therefore I say this is a wrong view of those recluses and Brahmins.û

12. When this was said the wandering ascetic Sãvaka said to the Blessed One, ßGood Gotama, now I understand. Think of me as a lay disciple who has taken refuge from today until I live.

13. ßBile, phlegm, air,
These three acting together, the change of seasons,
Unusual activity, sudden attacks
The eighth the results of earlier done actions.û

35. 3. 2.
(22) Aññhasata Ý One Hundred and Eight

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there: ßMonks, I will teach you the analysis of feelings into one hundred and eight, listen to it.

3. ßMonks, what is the method of analysis of feelings into one hundred eight? In a certain analysis I have said that there are two feelings and also in other analyses as three, five, six, eighteen, thirty-six and as one hundred and eight feelings. Monks, my Teaching is thus analytical.

4. ßMonks, what are the two feelings? Monks, bodily and mental feelings are said to be the two feelings.

5. ßMonks, what are the three feelings? Monks pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings are said to be the three feelings.

6. ßMonks, what are the five feelings? Monks feelings functioning under, pleasure, displeasure, joy, grief and equanimity are said to be the five feelings.

7. ßMonks, what are the six feelings? Monks feelings born of, eye-contact, ear-contact, nose-contact, tongue-contact, body-contact and mind contact are said to be the six feelings.

8. ßMonks, what are the eighteen feelings? Monks, the application of the six feelings to discriminate joyfully, the application of the six feelings to discriminate painfully and the application of six feelings to discriminate indifferently, are said to be the eighteen feelings.

9. ßMonks, what are the thirty-six feelings? Monks, the application of the six worldly feelings to discriminate joyfully, application of the six beyond the world feelings to discriminate joyfully, application of the six worldly feelings to discriminate painfully, application of the six beyond the world feelings to discriminate painfully and application of the six worldly feelings to discriminate indifferently and the application of the six beyond the world feelings to discriminate indifferently are said to be the thirty-six feelings.

10. ßMonks, what are the one hundred and eight feelings? Monks they are the thirty-six above feelings, in the past, thirty-six above feelings in the future and thirty-six above feelings at present. Monks, these are the one hundred eight feelings. This is the method for analyzing the one hundred and eight feelings.û

35. 3. 3.
(23) Bhikkhu Ý Monk

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

2. Then a certain monk approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting on a side that monk said to the Blessed One: ßVenerable sir, how many are the feelings? How is the arising of feelings? What is the method for the arising of feelings? How is the cessation of feelings? What is the method for the cessation of feelings? What is the satisfaction of feelings? What is the danger of feelings? What is the escape from feelings?

4. ßMonk, pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings are the three feelings. Arising of a contact is the arising of feelings. Craving is the path and method for the arising of feelings. Cessation of the contact, is the cessation of feelings and this Noble Eightfold Path such as right view,  re  right concentration. is the method for the cessation of feelings, Whatever pleasantness and pleasure arises on account of feelings is the satisfaction of feelings. Feelings are impermanent, unpleasant, changing things is the danger of feelings. The taming and dispelling of interest and greed is the escape from feelings.û

35. 3. 4.
(24) Pubbe¤àõaü Ý Before Enlightenment

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there: ßMonks, when I was seeking enlightenment, this occurred to me. `How many are the feelings? What is the arising of feelings? What is the method for the arising of feelings? What is the cessation of feelings? What is the method for the cessation of feelings? What is the satisfaction of feelings? What is the danger of feelings? What is the escape from feelings?'

3. ßMonk, then it occurred to me these pleasant, unpleasant, and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings are the three feelings. Arising from a contact is the arising of feelings. Craving is the path and method for the arising of feelings. Cessation of the contact, is the cessation of feelings and this Noble Eightfold Path such as right view,  re  right concentration is the method for the cessation of feelings. Whatever pleasantness and pleasure arises on account of feelings is the satisfaction of feelings. Feelings are impermanent, unpleasant, changing things is the danger of feelings. The taming and dispelling of interest and greed is the escape from feelings.û

35. 2. 5.
(25) ¥àõa Ý Knowledge

4. ßMonks, `these are feelings' is a thing I have not heard before; that vision, knowledge, wisdom, science and light arose to me.

5. ßMonks, `this is the arising of feelings' is a thing I have not heard before; that vision, knowledge, wisdom, science and light arose to me.

6. ßMonks, `this is the method for the arising of feelings' is a thing I have not heard before; that vision, knowledge, wisdom, science and light arose to me.

7. ßMonks, `this is the cessation of feelings' is a thing I have not heard before; that vision, knowledge, wisdom, science and light arose to me.

8. ßMonks, `this is the method for the cessation of feelings' is a thing I have not heard before; that vision, knowledge, wisdom, science and light arose to me.

9. ßMonks, `this is the satisfaction in feelings' is a thing I have not heard before; that vision, knowledge, wisdom, science and light arose to me.

10. ßMonks, `this is the danger in feelings' is a thing I have not heard before; that vision, knowledge, wisdom, science and light arose to me.

11. ßMonks, `this is the escape from feelings' is a thing I have not heard before; that vision, knowledge, wisdom, science and light arose to me.û

35.3. 6.
(26) Bhikkhunà Ý Many Monks

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

2. Then many monks approached the Blessed One worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting on a side those monks said to the Blessed One: ßVenerable sir, how many are the feelings? What is the arising of feelings? What is the method for the arising of feelings? What is the cessation of feelings? What is the method for the cessation of feelings? What is the satisfaction of feelings? What is the danger of feelings? What is the escape from feelings?

4. ßMonk, pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings are the three feelings. Arising of a contact is the arising of feelings. Craving is the path and method for the arising of feelings. Cessation of the contact, is the cessation of feelings and this Noble Eightfold Path such as right view,  re  right concentration. is the method for the cessation of feelings, Whatever pleasantness and pleasure arises on account of feelings is the satisfaction of feelings. Feelings are impermanent, unpleasant, changing things is the danger of feelings. The taming and dispelling of interest and greed is the escape from feelings.û

35. 3. 7
(27) Samaõàbrahmanà 1 Ý Recluses and Brahmins

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there: ßMonks, these three are the feelings. What three? They are the pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings.

3. ßMonks, whoever recluses and Brahmins do not know these three feelings, their arising, fading, satisfaction, danger and escape as it really is, do not thoroughly know, realize and abide.

4. ßMonks, whoever recluses and Brahmins know these three feelings, their arising, fading, satisfaction, danger and escape as it really is, thoroughly know, realize and abide.û

35. 3. 8.
(28) Samaõàbrahmanà 2 Ý Recluses and Brahmins 2

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there: ßMonks, these three are the feelings. What three? They are the pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings.

3. ßMonks, whoever recluses and Brahmins do not know these three feelings, their arising, fading, satisfaction, danger and escape as it really is, do not thoroughly know, realize and abide.

4. ßMonks, whoever recluses and Brahmins know these three feelings, their arising, fading, satisfaction, danger and escape as it really is, thoroughly know, realize and abide.û

35. 3. 9.
(29) Samaõàbrahmanà 3 Ý Recluses and Brahmins 3

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there: ßMonks, these three are the feelings. What three? They are the pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings.

3. ßMonks, whoever recluses and Brahmins do not know these three feelings, their arising, fading, satisfaction, danger and escape as it really is, do not thoroughly know, realize and abide.

4. ßMonks, whoever recluses and Brahmins know these three feelings, their arising, fading, satisfaction, danger and escape as it really is, thoroughly know, realize and abide.û

 

35. 3. 10.
(30) Suddhikaü niràmisaü Ý Immaterial Purity

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels' sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there: ßMonks, these three are the feelings. What three? They are the pleasant, the unpleasant, and the neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings.û

 

35. 3. 11.
(31) Suddhikaü niràmisaü Ý Immaterial Purity (Continuted)

3. ßMonks, there are emotions of joy that are material, that are immaterial, and that are fine immaterial. Monks there is pleasantness that is material, that is immaterial, and that is fine immaterial. Monks there is equanimity that is material, that is immaterial, and that is fine immaterial. Monks there is material release, there is immaterial release, and fine immaterial release.

4. ßMonks, what are material emotions of joy? Monks, there are the five strands of sense pleasures such as welcome pleasant forms cognizable by eye-consciousness, welcome pleasant sounds cognizable by ear-consciousness welcome pleasant scents cognizable by nose-consciousness, welcome pleasant tastes cognizable by tongue-consciousness and welcome pleasant touches cognizable by body-consciousness. Monks, the emotions of joy that arise on account of these five strands of sense pleasure is called material emotions of joy.

5. ßMonks, what are immaterial emotions of joy? Here monks, the monk secluded from sensual pleasures and demerit thoughts with thoughts and thought processes and with pleasant emotions of joy born from seclusion abides in the first high stage of mind. Overcoming thoughts and thought processes and internally calming the self and the mind in one point without thoughts and thought processes and with pleasant emotions of joy born from concentration he abides in the second high stage of mind. Monks, this is called immaterial emotions of joy.

6. ßMonks, what are the fine emotions of joy? Monks, when the monk who has destroyed desires, reflects the release of his mind from greed, from hate and from delusion, fine emotions of joy arise to him. To these are said fine immaterial emotions of joy.

7. ßMonks, what is material pleasantness? Monks, there are the five strands of sense pleasures such as welcome pleasant forms cognizable by eye-consciousness, welcome pleasant sounds cognizable by ear-consciousness welcome pleasant scents cognizable by nose-consciousness, welcome pleasant tastes cognizable by tongue-consciousness and welcome pleasant touches cognizable by body-consciousness. Monks, the material pleasantness that arise on account of these five strands of sense pleasure is called material pleasantness.

8. ßMonks, what is immaterial pleasantness? Here monks, the monk secluded from sensual pleasures and demerit thoughts, with thoughts and thought processes and with pleasant emotions of joy born from seclusion abides in the first high stage of mind. Overcoming thoughts and thought processes and internally calming the self and the mind in one point without thoughts and thought processes and with pleasant emotions of joy born from concentration abides in the second high stage of mind. The monk abides mindful and aware of emotions of joy, of fading and of equanimity and feels pleasantness with the body too, the noble ones say, this is abiding mindfully in pleasantness with equanimity. The monk abides in this third higher stage of mind. Monks, this is called immaterial pleasantness

9. ßMonks, what is fine immaterial pleasantness?. Monks, when the monk who has destroyed desires, reflects the release of his mind from greed, from hate and from delusion, pleasantness and pleasure arise to him. To this is said fine immaterial pleasantness.

10. ßMonks, what is material equanimity? Monks, there are the five strands of sense pleasures such as welcome pleasant forms cognizable by eye-consciousness, welcome pleasant sounds cognizable by ear-consciousness welcome pleasant scents cognizable by nose-consciousness, welcome pleasant tastes cognizable by tongue-consciousness and welcome pleasant touches cognizable by body-consciousness. Monks, the material equanimity that arise on account of these five strands of sense pleasure is called material equanimity.

11. ßMonks, what is immaterial equanimity? Here, monks, the monk dispelling pleasant and unpleasant feelings and earlier having overcome pleasure and displeasure, purifying the mind with equanimity so that it is neither unpleasant nor pleasant he abides in the fourth higher stage of mind. Monks, to this it is said immaterial equanimity.

12. ßMonks, what is fine immaterial equanimity? Monks, when the monk who has destroyed desires, reflects the release of his mind from greed, from hate and from delusion, fine immaterial equanimity arises to him. To this is said fine immaterial equanimity.

13. ßMonks, what is release from matter? Monks, the release from the bonds of matter, is material release.

14. ßMonks, what is release from the immaterial? Monks, the release from the bonds of the immaterial is immaterial release.

15. ßMonks, what is release from the fine immaterial? Monks, when the monk who has destroyed desires, reflects the release of his mind from greed, from hate and from delusion, release arises to him. To this is said release from the fine immaterial.û