Sutta Pitaka
Samyutta Nikàya
Volume IV Ý Saëàyatanavaggo
Samyutta 35 Ý Vedanà Saüyutta
Chapter 2 Ý Rahogata Vaggo

35. 2. 1.
(11) Rahogata Ý Seclusion

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. Then a certain monk approached the Blessed One worshipped and sat on side

3. Sitting on a side that monk said to the Blessed One: ßVenerable sir, when I was in my seclusion, this thought process arose to me. Three feelings are pointed out by the Blessed One; as pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant. Further it was said by the Blessed One, that whatever is felt is unpleasant. Venerable sir, for what reason was it said that whatever is felt is unpleasant?

4. ßExcellent monk! These three feelings are pointed out by me; as pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant. Further I have said that whatever is felt is unpleasant. Monk, I have said this on account of the destructive, fading, losing interest, ceasing and changing nature of intentions.

5. ßThus, monk I have declared the gradual cessation of intentions. To one in the first higher stage of the mind words cease. To one in the second higher stage of the mind thoughts and thought processes cease. To one in the third higher stage of the mind the emotion of joy ceases. To one in the fourth higher stage of the mind in and out breathing cease. To one attained to the sphere of space perceptions of matter cease. To one attained to the sphere of consciousness perceptions of space cease. To one attained to the sphere of nothingness perceptions of consciousness cease. To one attained to the sphere of neither perception nor non-perception the perceptions of nothingness cease. To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings perceptions and feelings cease. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion cease.

6. ßThus, monk I have declared the gradual calming of intentions. To one in the first higher stage of mind words are calmed. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes are calmed. To one in the third higher stage of mind the emotion of joy is calmed. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind in and out breathing is calmed. To one attained to the sphere of space perceptions of matter are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of consciousness perceptions of space are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of nothingness perceptions of consciousness are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of neither perception nor non-perception the perceptions of nothingness are calmed. To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings perceptions and feelings are calmed. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion are calmed.

7. ßMonks, these six are the tranquilities. to one in the first higher stage of mind words are reposed. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes are reposed. To one in the third higher stage of mind emotions of joy are reposed. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind in and out breathing are reposed.  re  To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, they are reposed. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion are reposed.û

35. 2. 2.
(12) âkàsaü 1 Ý In Space 1

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. ßMonks, just as various winds blow in space, winds blow from the east, west, north, south, dusty winds, pure winds, cold winds, hot winds, small winds and storms blow in space. In the same manner monks, pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings arise in this body.

Just as various winds blow in space,
From the east, west, north and south.

Some dusty and pure, cold and hot on a day.
Storms and small winds blow variously.

Likewise, pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant
feelings arise in this body.

Of all these feelings
The zealous, passionless monk thoroughly knows.

Knowing he is without desires here and now,
After death he does not come to a reckoning.û

35. 2. 3.
(13) âkàsaü 2 Ý In Space 2

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. ßMonks, just as various winds blow in space, winds blow from the east, west, north, south, dusty winds, pure winds, cold winds, hot winds, small winds and storms blow in space. In the same manner monks, pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings arise in this body.û

35. 2. 4.
(14) Agàraü Ý Inhabit

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. ßMonks, just as guests come and inhabit, from the east, west, north and south, warriors, Brahmins, householders and the low caste, in the same manner monks, pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings arise in this body.

4. ßMaterial pleasant feelings, material unpleasant feelings, material neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings and immaterial pleasant feelings, immaterial unpleasant feelings and immaterial neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings arise.û

35. 2. 5.
(15) SantakamÝ Belongings

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. Then venerable ânanda approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting on a side venerable ânanda said to the Blessed One-ßVenerable sir, how many are the feelings? What is the arising of feelings? What is the cessation of feelings? What is the path for the cessation of feelings? What is the satisfaction in feelings? What are the dangers of feelings and what is the escape from feelings?

4. ßânanda, pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings are the three feelings. Dependent on a contact arise feelings, with the cessation of the contact cease feelings. This same Noble Eightfold Path is the path for the cessation of feelings, consisting of right view,  re  right concentration. The arising of pleasure and pleasantness dependent on a feeling is the satisfaction in feelings. The fact that feelings are impermanent, unpleasant and change, is the danger of feelings. The taming and dispelling of interest and greed for feelings is the escape from feelings.

5. ßMonk I have declared the gradual cessation of intentions in this manner, to one in the first higher stage of mind words cease. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes cease. To one in the third higher stage of mind emotions of joy cease. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind, in and out breathing ceases. To one attained to the sphere of space, perceptions of matter cease. To one attained to the sphere of consciousness, perceptions of space cease. To one attained to the sphere of nothingness, perceptions of consciousness cease. To one attained to the sphere of neither perceptions nor non-perceptions, perceptions of nothingness cease. To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, perceptions and feelings cease. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion cease.

6. ßThus, monk I have declared the gradual calming of intentions. To one in the first higher stage of mind words are calmed. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes are calmed. To one in the third higher stage of mind the emotions of joy, are calmed. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind, in and out breathing is calmed. To one attained to the sphere of space, perceptions of matter are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of consciousness, perceptions of space are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of nothingness, perceptions of consciousness are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of neither perceptions nor non-perceptions, perceptions of nothingness are calmed. To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, perceptions and feelings are calmed. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion are calmed.

7. ßMonks, to one in the first higher stage of mind words are reposed. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes are reposed. To one in the third higher stage of mind emotions of joy are reposed. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind in and out breathing is reposed.  re  To one attaind to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, perceptions and feelings are reposed. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion are reposed.û

35. 2. 6.
(16) Santakam 2 Ý Belongings 2

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. Then venerable ânanda approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. The Blessed One said to venerable ânanda who was sitting on a side: ßânanda, how many are the feelings? What is the arising of feelings? What is the cessation of feelings? What is the path for the cessation of feelings? What is the satisfaction in feelings? What are the dangers of feelings and what is the escape from feelings?û

4. ßVenerable sir, the leading to the Teaching is from the Blessed One and the monks hearing it from the Blessed One will bear it in their minds.û

Then, ânanda, listen and attend carefully, I will tell you.

5. ßânanda, pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings are the three feelings. Dependent on a contact arise feelings, with the cessation of the contact, feelings cease. This same Noble Eightfold Path is the path for the cessation of feelings, consisting of right view,  re  right concentration. The arising of pleasure and pleasantness dependent on a feeling is the satisfaction in feelings. The fact that feelings are impermanent, unpleasant and change is the danger of feelings. The taming and dispelling of interest and greed for feelings is the escape from feelings.

6. ßMonk I have declared the gradual cessation of intentions in this manner, to one in the first higher stage of mind words cease. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes cease. To one in the third higher stage of mind emotions of joy cease. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind, in and out breathing ceases. To one attained to the sphere of space, perceptions of matter cease. To one attained to the sphere of consciousness, perceptions of space cease. To one attained to the sphere of nothingness, perceptions of consciousness cease. To one attained to the sphere of neither perceptions nor non-perceptions, perceptions of nothingness cease. To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, perceptions and feelings cease. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion cease.

7. ßThus, monk I have declared the gradual calming of intentions. To one in the first higher stage of mind words are calmed. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes are calmed. To one in the third higher stage of mind the emotions of joy, are calmed. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind, in and out breathing is calmed. To one attained to the sphere of space, perceptions of matter are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of consciousness, perceptions of space are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of nothingness, perceptions of consciousness are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of neither perceptions nor non-perceptions, perceptions of nothingness are calmed. To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, perceptions and feelings are calmed. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion are calmed.

8. ßMonks, to one in the first higher stage of mind words are reposed. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes are reposed. To one in the third higher stage of mind emotions of joy are reposed. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind in and out breathing is reposed.  re  To one attaind to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, perceptions and feelings are reposed. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion are reposed.û

 

35. 2. 7.
(17) Aññhaka Ý Watch Tower 1

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. Then many monks approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting on a side, those monks said to the Blessed One-ßVenerable sir, how many are the feelings? What is the arising of feelings? What is the cessation of feelings? What is the path for the cessation of feelings? What is the satisfaction in feelings? What are the dangers of feelings and what is the escape from feelings?

4. ßMonks, pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings are the three feelings. Dependent on a contact feelings arise, with the cessation of the contact feelings cease. This same Noble Eightfold Path is the path for the cessation of feelings, consisting of right view,  re  right concentration. The arising of pleasure and pleasantness dependent on a feeling, is the satisfaction in feelings. The fact that feelings are impermanent, unpleasant and change is the danger of feelings. The taming and dispelling of interest and greed for feelings is the escape from feelings.

5. ßMonk I have declared the gradual cessation of intentions in this manner, to one in the first higher stage of mind words cease. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes cease. To one in the third higher stage of mind emotions of joy cease. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind, in and out breathing ceases. To one attained to the sphere of space, perceptions of matter cease. To one attained to the sphere of consciousness, perceptions of space cease. To one attained to the sphere of nothingness, perceptions of consciousness cease. To one attained to the sphere of neither perceptions nor non-perceptions, perceptions of nothingness cease. To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, perceptions and feelings cease. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion cease.

6. ßThus, monk I have declared the gradual calming of intentions. To one in the first higher stage of mind words are calmed. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes are calmed. To one in the third higher stage of mind the emotions of joy, are calmed. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind, in and out breathing is calmed. To one attained to the sphere of space, perceptions of matter are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of consciousness, perceptions of space are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of nothingness, perceptions of consciousness are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of neither perceptions nor non-perceptions, perceptions of nothingness are calmed. To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, perceptions and feelings are calmed. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion are calmed.

7. ßMonks, these six are reposes, to one in the first higher stage of mind words are reposed. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes are reposed. To one in the third higher stage of mind emotions of joy are reposed. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind in and out breathing is reposed.  re  To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, perceptions and feelings are reposed. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion are reposed.û

35. 2. 8.
(18) Aññhaka Ý Watch Tower 2

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. Then many monks approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. The Blessed One said to those monks who were sitting on a side: ßMonks, how many are the feelings? What is the arising of feelings? What is the cessation of feelings? What is the path for the cessation of feelings? What is the satisfaction in feelings? What are the dangers of feelings and what is the escape from feelings?û

4. ßVenerable sir, the leading to the Teaching is from the Blessed One and the monks hearing it from the Blessed One will bear it in their minds.û

Then, monks listen and attend carefully, I will tell you.û

5. ßMonka, pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings are the three feelings. Dependent on a contact feelings arise, with the cessation of the contact, feelings cease. This same Noble Eightfold Path is the path for the cessation of feelings, consisting of right view,  re  right concentration. The arising of pleasure and pleasantness dependent on a feeling is the satisfaction in feelings. The fact that feelings are impermanent, unpleasant and change is the danger of feelings. The taming and dispelling of interest and greed for feelings is the escape from feelings.

6. ßMonks I have declared the gradual cessation of intentions in this manner, to one in the first higher stage of mind words cease. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes cease. To one in the third higher stage of mind emotions of joy cease. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind, in and out breathing ceases. To one attained to the sphere of space, perceptions of matter cease. To one attained to the sphere of consciousness, perceptions of space cease. To one attained to the sphere of nothingness, perceptions of consciousness cease. To one attained to the sphere of neither perceptions nor non-perceptions, perceptions of nothingness cease. To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, perceptions and feelings cease. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion cease.

7. ßThus, monk I have declared the gradual calming of intentions. To one in the first higher stage of mind words are calmed. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes are calmed. To one in the third higher stage of mind the emotions of joy are calmed. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind, in and out breathing is calmed. To one attained to the sphere of space, perceptions of matter are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of consciousness, perceptions of space are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of nothingness, perceptions of consciousness are calmed. To one attained to the sphere of neither perceptions nor non-perceptions, perceptions of nothingness are calmed. To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, perceptions and feelings are calmed. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate and delusion are calmed.

8. ßMonks, to one in the first higher stage of mind words are reposed. To one in the second higher stage of mind thoughts and thought processes are reposed. To one in the third higher stage of mind emotions of joy are reposed. To one in the fourth higher stage of mind in and out breathing is reposed.  re  To one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings, perceptions and feelings are reposed. To the monk who has destroyed desires, greed, hate, and delusion are reposed.û

 

35. 2. 9.
(19 Pa¤cakaïgo Ý The Carpenter Pa¤cakaïga

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. Then the carpenter Pa¤cakaïga approached venerable Udàyã worshipped and sat on a side

3. Sitting the carpenter Pa¤cakaïga said to venerable Udàyã: ßVenerable sir, of how many feelings has the Blessed One spoken about?

Carpenter, the Blessed One has said of three feelings. They are pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings.

4. When this was said, the carpenter Pa¤cakaïga said, ßVenerable sir, the Blessed One had said of only two feelings, that is pleasant and unpleasant feelings, the Blessed One has said that the neither unpleasant nor pleasant feeling is an exalted feeling out of the pleasant feelings.û

5. For the second time venerable Udàyã said ßCarpenter, the Blessed One has said of three feelings. They are pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings.û For the second time the carpenter Pa¤cakaïga said, ßVenerable sir, the Blessed One had said of only two feelings, that is pleasant and unpleasant feelings, the Blessed One has said that the neither unpleasant nor pleasant feeling is an exalted feeling out of the pleasant feelingsû.

6. For the third time venerable Udàyã said ßCarpenter, the Blessed One has said of three feelings. They are pleasant, unpleasant and neither unpleasant nor pleasant feelings.û For the third time the carpenter Pa¤cakaïga said, ßVenerable sir, the Blessed One had said, of only two feelings, that is pleasant and unpleasant feelings, the Blessed One has said that the neither unpleasant nor pleasant feeling is an exalted feeling out of the pleasant feelingsû Venerable Udàyã could not convince the carpenter Pa¤cakaïga on this, nor could the carpenter Pa¤cakaïga convince venerable Udàyã on this.

7. Venerable ânanda heard this conversation between venerable Udàyã and the carpenter Pa¤cakaïga

8. Venerable ânanda approached the Blessed One worshipped, sat on a side and informed the Blessed One all the conversation that took place between venerable Udàyã and the carpenter Pa¤cakaïga.

9. ßânanda, there is a method according to which the carpenter Pa¤cakaïga would not be pleased with the monk Udàyã and there is a method according to which the monk Udàyã would not be pleased with the carpenter Pa~cakanga. ânanda, in a certain analysis I have said that there are two feelings and also in other analyses as three, five, six, eighteen, thirty-six and as one hundred and eight feelings. ânanda, my Teaching is thus analytical.

10. ßânanda, they who do not know my Teaching analytically discoursed, by cross questioning, approving and rejoicing with pleasant minds and pleasant words could expect enmity, arising of quarrels and controversies, taking sides and the arising of verbal disputes. ânanda, they who know my Teaching analytically discoursed, by cross questioning, approving and rejoicing with pleasant minds and pleasant words could expect unity, rejoicing, without controversial points would be united like the mixing of milk and water and would abide looking at each other pleasantly.

11. ßânanda, these are the five strands of sense pleasures such as welcome pleasant forms cognizable by eye-consciousness, welcome pleasant sounds cognizable by ear-consciousness welcome pleasant scents cognizable by nose-consciousness, welcome pleasant tastes cognizable by tongue-consciousness and welcome pleasant touches cognizable by body-consciousness. ânanda, the pleasantness and pleasure that arise on account of these five strands of sense pleasure is called sense pleasure.

12. ßânanda, if someone would say this is the highest pleasure and pleasantness that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? ânanda, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. ânanda, what is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, ânanda, the monk, secluding the mind from sensual pleasures and demerit, with thoughts and thought processes and with emotions of joy arising from seclusion, abides in the first higher stage of mind. ânanda, this is a pleasantness that goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid

13. ßânanda, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? ânanda, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. ânanda, what is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, ânanda, the monk calming thoughts and thought processes and internally calmed with the mind in one point and emotions of joy arising from concentration, he abides in the second higher stage of mind. ânanda, this is a pleasantness that goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

14. ßânanda, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? ânanda, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. ânanda, what is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, ânanda, the monk abides mindful and aware of emotions of joy, of fading and of equanimity and feels pleasantness with the body too The noble ones say, that this is abiding mindfully in pleasantness with equanimity. The monk abides in this third higher stage of mind. This goes beyond and is exalted, than the aforesaid.

15. ßânanda, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? ânanda, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. ânanda, what is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, ânanda, the monk dispelling pleasant and unpleasant feelings and earlier having overcome pleasure and displeasure, purifying the mind with equanimity so that it is neither unpleasant nor pleasant and abides in the fourth higher stage of mind. This goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

16. ßânanda, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? ânanda, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. ânanda, what is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, ânanda, the monk overcomes all perceptions of matter and all perceptions of repulsion and not attending to various perceptions, with space is boundless abides in the sphere of space. This goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

17. ßânanda, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? ânanda, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. ânanda, what is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, ânanda, the monk overcomes all perceptions of space with consciousness is boundless abides in the sphere of consciousness. This goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

18. ßânanda, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness that beings feel, I say it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? ânanda, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. ânanda, what is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, ânanda, the monk overcomes all perceptions of consciousness and with there is nothing abides in the sphere of nothingness. This goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

19. ßânanda, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness and pleasure that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? ânanda, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. ânanda, what is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, ânanda, the monk overcomes all the sphere of nothingness with there is neither perception nor non-perception abides in the sphere of neither perception nor non-perception. This goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

20. ßânanda, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness and pleasure that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? ânanda, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. ânanda, what is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, ânanda, the monk overcoming all the sphere of neither perceptions nor non-perceptions, abides in the cessation of perceptions and feelings. This goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

21. ßânanda, there is a possibility, for wandering ascetics of other sects to say, the recluse Gotama has told about the cessation of perceptions and feelings, he has pointed out that it is a pleasantness, how could it be a pleasantness, what is the pleasure there? ânanda, this is the reply to those wandering ascetics of other sects. `Friends, the Blessed One does not point out as pleasant even the pleasant feelings. Friends, in whatever manner pleasantness is gained, in this and other instance, there it was pointed out as pleasant'.û

35. 2. 10.
(20) Bhikkhunà Ý By A Monk

1. At one time the Blessed One lived in the gabled hall in the Great Forest in Vesali.

2. Then a certain monk approached the Blessed One worshipped and sat on a side

3. Sitting that monk said to the Blessed One: ßVenerable sir, how many feelings has the Blessed One pointed out? Monk, in a certain analysis I have said that there are two feelings and also in other analyses as three, five, six, eighteen, thirty-six and as one hundred and eight feelings. Monk, my Teaching is thus analytical.

4. ßThey who do not know my Teaching analytically discoursed, by cross questioning, approving and rejoicing with pleasant minds and pleasant words could expect enmity, arising of quarrels and controversies, taking sides and the arising of verbal disputes. Monk, they who know my Teaching analytically discoursed, by cross questioning, approving and rejoicing with pleasant minds and pleasant words could expect unity, rejoicing, without controversial points would be united like the mixing of milk and water and would abide looking at each other pleasantly.

5. ßMonk, these are the five strands of sense pleasures such as welcome pleasant forms cognizable by eye-consciousness, welcome pleasant sounds cognizable by ear-consciousness welcome pleasant scents cognizable by nose-consciousness, welcome pleasant tastes cognizable by tongue-consciousness and welcome pleasant touches cognizable by body-consciousness. Monk, the pleasantness and pleasure that arise on account of these five strands of sense pleasure is called sense pleasure.

6. ßMonk, if someone would say this is the highest pleasure and pleasantness that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? Monk, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. What is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, monk, the monk, secluding the mind from sensual pleasures and demerit, with thoughts and thought processes and with emotions of joy arising from seclusion, abides in the first higher stage of mind. Monk, this is a pleasantness that goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid

7. ßMonk, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? Monk, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. What is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, monk, the monk calming thoughts and thought processes and internally calmed with the mind in one point and emotions of joy arising from concentration, he abides in the second higher stage of mind. Monk, this is a pleasantness that goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

8. ßMonk, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? Monk, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. ânanda, what is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, monk, the monk abides mindful and aware of emotions of joy, of fading and of equanimity and feels pleasantness with the body too The noble ones say, that this is abiding mindfully in pleasantness with equanimity. The monk abides in this third higher stage of mind. This goes beyond and is exalted, than the aforesaid.

9. ßMonk, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? Monk, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. What is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, monk, the monk dispelling pleasant and unpleasant feelings and earlier having overcome pleasure and displeasure, purifies the mind with equanimity so that it is neither unpleasant nor pleasant and abides in the fourth higher stage of mind. This goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

10. ßMonk, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? Monk, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. What is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, monk, the monk overcomes all perceptions of matter and repulsion and not attending to various perceptions, with space is boundless abides in the sphere of space. This goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

11. ßMonk, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? Monk, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. What is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, monk, the monk overcomes all perceptions of space with consciousness is boundless abides in the sphere of consciousness. This goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

12. ßMonk, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness that beings feel, I say it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? Monk, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. What is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, monk, the monk overcomes all perceptions of consciousness and with there is nothing abides in the sphere of nothingness. This goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

13. ßMonk, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness and pleasure that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? Monk, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. What is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, monk, the monk overcomes all the sphere of nothingness with there is neither perception nor non-perception abides in the sphere of neither perception nor non-perception. This goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

14. ßMonk, if someone would say this is the highest pleasantness and pleasure that beings feel I say, it is not so, I do not approve it. What is the reason? Monk, there is a pleasantness that goes beyond this and is more exalted. What is that pleasantness which goes beyond this and is more exalted than this? Here, monk, the monk overcoming all the sphere of neither perceptions nor non-perceptions, abides in the cessation of perceptions and feelings. This goes beyond and is exalted than the aforesaid.

15. ßMonk, there is a possibility, for wandering ascetics of other sects to say, the recluse Gotama has told about the cessation of perceptions and feelings, he has pointed out that it is a pleasantness, how could it be a pleasantness, what is the pleasure there? Monk, this is the reply to those wandering ascetics of other sects. `Friends, the Blessed One does not point out as pleasant even the pleasant feelings. Friends, in whatever manner pleasantness is gained, in this and other instance, there it was pointed out as pleasant.û