Sutta Pitaka
Samyutta Nikàya
Volume IV Ý Saëàyatanavaggo
Samyutta 40 Ý Citta Saüyutta

 

40. 1. 1.
(1) Saüyojana Ý Bonds

1. At one time many elder monks were living in the Ambataka grove in Macchikasanda.

2. Then many elder monks after the midday meal, assembled, were seated in a circle and a dispute arose among them; ßare bonds and binding things different in meaning and differ in words or are bonds and binding things the same in meaning and different in words?û

3. Some elder monks there declared, ßBonds and binding things are different in meaning and differ in words,û and some other elder monks declared ßBonds and binding things are the same in meaning and different in words.û

4. At that time the householder Citta had entered the path of the wild animals for some business.

5. And Citta the householder overheard this conversation of the elder monks who were seated in a circle and disputing after the midday meal. ßFriends, are bonds and binding things different in meaning and different in words or are they the same in meaning and different in words.û He heard some elder monks there declare ßbonds and binding things are different in meaning and different in words,û and some other elder monks declare ßbonds and binding things are the same in meaning and different in words.û

6. Then Citta the householder approached the elder monks, worshipped and sat on a side.

7. Sitting on a side the householder Citta said to the elder monks: ßVenerable sirs, I overheard this conversation of the elder monks who were seated in a circle and disputing after the midday meal. `Friends, are bonds and binding things different in meaning and different in words or are bonds and binding things the same in meaning and different in words.' I heard some elder monks declare, `Bonds and binding things are different in meaning and different in words,' and some other elder monks declare `Bonds and binding things are the same in meaning and different in words'.û

ßHouseholder, it happened so.û

8. ßVenerable sirs, bonds and binding things are different in meaning and differ in words, Sirs, I will give a comparison for this, for a certain wise person understands the meaning with a comparison.

9. ßIt's like a dark buffalo and a fair buffalo are yoked together with a chain or rope and if someone says the dark buffalo is the bond of the fair buffalo and the fair buffalo is the bond of the dark buffalo,' does he express it correctly?û

ßNo, householder, the dark buffalo is not the bond of the fair buffalo, nor the fair buffalo the bond of the dark buffalo, yet the bond is the chain or the rope with which they are bound together.û

10. ßIn the same manner sirs, the eye is not the bond of forms and forms are not the bond of the eye, yet the interest and greed that arise on account of these two is the bond there. The ear is not the bond of sounds and sounds are not the bond of the ear, yet the interest and greed that arise on account of these two is the bond there. The nose is not the bond of scents and scents are not the bond of the nose, yet the interest and greed that arise on account of these two is the bond there. The tongue is not the bond of tastes, and tastes are not the bond of the tongue, yet the interest and greed that arise on account of these two is the bond there. The body is not the bond of touches and touches are not the bond of the body, yet the interest and greed that arise on account of these two is the bond there. The mind is not the bond of ideas and ideas are not the bond of the mind, yet the interest and greed that arise on account of these two is the bond there.û

11. ßHouseholder, it's great gain for us, that you have seen through the deep meaning of the words of the Blessed One.û

40. 1. 2.
(2) Isidatta 1 Ý Venerable Isidatta 1

1. At one time many elder monks were living in the Ambataka grove in Macchikasanda.

2. Then the householder Citta approached the elder monks, worshipped and sat on side.

3. Sitting on a side the householder Citta said to the elder monks: ßVenerable sirs, accept tomorrow's meal from me.û

The elder monks accepted the offer in silence.

4. Then the householder Citta knowing that the elder monks have accepted the offer got up from his seat, worshipped, and circumambulated the elder monks and went away.

5. Then the elder monks at the end of that night when it was morning, dressing robes and taking bowls and robes approached the house of Citta the householder and sat on the prepared seats.

6. Then the householder Citta approached the elder monks worshipped and sat on a side.

7. Sitting on a side the householder Citta said to the elder monks: ßVenerable sirs, it is said `diverse elements'. To what has the Blessed One said diverse elements?û

When this was asked the elder monks became silent.

8. For the second time the householder Citta said to the elder monks: ßVenerable sirs, it is said, `diverse elements'. To what has the Blessed One said diverse elements?û

When this was asked for the second time the elder monks became silent.

9. Even for the third time the householder Citta said to the elder monks: ßVenerable sirs, it is said, `diverse elements'. To what has the Blessed One said diverse elements?û

When this was asked for the third time the elder monks became silent.

10. At that time, out of those elder monks the monk with the least number of years as an elder was venerable Isidatta.

11. Then venerable Isidatta said to the elder monks, ßVenerable sirs, permit me to answer the householder Citta's question.û

They said, ßIsidatta, answer the householder Citta's question.û

12. ßHouseholder, do you ask, `Venerable sirs, it is said ßdiverse elementsû. To what has the Blessed One said diverse elements?'.û

ßThat is right venerable sir.û

ßHouseholder, the Blessed One has said diverse elements for the element of the eye, the element of forms, the element of eye-consciousness, the element of the ear, the element of sounds, the element of ear-consciousness, the element of the nose, the element of scents, the element of nose-consciousness, the element of the tongue, the element of tastes, the element of tongue-consciousness, the element of the body, the element of touches, the element of body-consciousness, the element of the mind, the element of ideas, and the element of mind-consciousness.û

13. Then the householder Citta delighted in the words of venerable Isidatta accepted them, and satisfied and pleased the elder monks with nourishing eatables and drinks with his own hands.

14. Then the elder monks partook the meal and putting away their bowls went away.

15. Then those elder monks said to venerable Isidatta: ßFriend, Isidatta, it's good that you explained that question. In this same manner you should explain any other questions that come up.û

40. 1. 3.
(3) Isidatta 2 Ý Venerable Isidatta 2

1. At one time many elder monks were living in the Ambataka grove in Macchikasanda.

2. Then the householder Citta approached the elder monks, worshipped and sat on side.

3. Sitting on a side the householder Citta said to the elder monks: ßVenerable sirs, accept tomorrow's meal from me.û

The elder monks accepted the offer in silence.

4. Then the householder Citta knowing that the elder monks had accepted the offer got up from his seat, worshipped, and circumambulated the elder monks and went away.

5. Then the elder monks at the end of that night when it was morning, dressing robes and taking bowls and robes approached the house of Citta the householder and sat on the prepared seats.

6. Then the householder Citta approached the elder monks worshipped and sat on a side

7. Sitting on a side the householder Citta said to the elder monks: ßVenerable sirs, various views arise in the world, such as the world is everlasting or not everlasting, the world is limited or not limited, life and body is the same, or life is different from the body, or the Thus Gone One is after death, or the Thus Gone One is not after death, or the Thus Gone One is and is not after death, or the Thus Gone One neither is nor is not after death, the sixty two views as told in the Brahmajala Sutta. Venerable sirs, when what is present, are these views present and when what is not present are these views not present?û

When this was asked the elder monks became silent.

8. For the second time the householder Citta said to the elder monks: ßVenerable sirs, when what is present are these views present?*

When this was asked for the second time elder monks became silent.

9. Even for the third time the householder Citta said to the elder monks: ßVenerable sirs, when what is present are these views present?*

When this was asked for the third time the elder monks became silent.

10. At that time, out of those elder monks the monk with the least number of years as a elder was venerable Isidatta.

11. Then venerable Isidatta said to the elder monks, ßVenerable sirs, permit me to answer the householder Citta's question.û

They said, ßIsidatta, answer the householder Citta's question.û

12. ßHouseholder, do you ask `Venerable sirs, these various views arise in the world such as the world is everlasting and so on. Venerable sirs, when what is present, are these views present and when what is not present are these views not present?'.û

ßThat is right venerable sir.û

ßHouseholder, the various views arise in the world, such as the world is everlasting or not everlasting, the world is limited or not limited, life and body is the same, or life is different from the body, or the Thus Gone One is after death, or the Thus Gone One is not after death, or the Thus Gone One is and is not after death, or the Thus Gone One neither is nor is not after death, the sixty two views as told in the Brahmajala Sutta arise when the self view is present and they do not arise when the self view is not present.û

13. ßVenerable sir, how does the self view arise?

ßHouseholder, the not learned ordinary man, who has not seen noble ones or Great Men, not heard their Teaching, not tamed or clever in their Teaching reflects matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self. He reflects feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in feelings self or in self feelings. He reflects perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions or in perceptions self. He reflects intentions from self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self. He reflects consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or in consciousness self. Householder, this is the arising of self view.

14. ßVenerable sir, how does the self view not arise?

ßHouseholder, the learned noble disciple who has seen noble ones and Great Men heard their Teaching, tamed and clever in their Teaching does not reflect matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self. He does not reflect feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in self feelings, or in feelings self. He does not reflect perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions, or in perceptions self. He does not reflect intentions from self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self. He does not reflect consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or in consciousness self. Householder, this is non arising of the self view.û

15. ßVenerable sir, Isidatta from where do you come?û

ßHouseholder, I come from Avanti.û

ßVenerable sir, is there a clansman named Isidatta in Avanti, who has gone forth from the Ambataka grove, we were friends who have not seen each other. Have you seen him sir?û

ßYes, householder, I have seen himû

ßWhere does venerable Isidatta live at present?û

When this was asked venerable Isidatta was silent. ßVenerable sir, are you that venerable Isidatta?û ßHouseholder, yes, I am, Isidatta.û

ßVenerable Isidatta, be pleased to live in the Ambataka grove in Micchikasanda. I will attend to the needs of the venerable one and support offering robes, morsel food, dwellings and requisites when ill.û

ßHouseholder, your words are good!û

16. The householder Citta delighted in the words of venerable Isidatta, agreed with him and satisfied and pleased the elder monks offering nourishing eatables and drinks with his own hands.

17. Then the elder monks having partaken the meal and putting away their bowls went away.

18. Then those elder monks said to venerable Isidatta: ßFriend, Isidatta, it's good that you explained that question. In this same manner you should explain any other questions that come up.û

19. Then venerable Isidatta arranged his dwelling and taking bowl and robes went away from Micchikasanda not to come back again.file:///d:/mettanet70/tipitaka/2Sutta-Pitaka/3Samyutta-Nikaya/index.html40. 1. 4.
(4) Mahako Ý Venerable Mahaka

1. At one time many elder monks were living in the Ambataka grove in Macchikasanda.

2. Then the householder Citta approached the elder monks, worshipped and sat on side.

3. Sitting on a side the householder Citta said to the elder monks: ßVenerable sirs, accept tomorrow's meal from me at the cattle station.û

The elder monks accepted the offer in silence.

4. Then the householder Citta knowing that the elder monks have accepted the offer got up from his seat, worshipped, and circumambulated the elder monks and went away.

5. Then the elder monks at the end of that night when it was morning, dressing robes and taking bowls and robes approached the cattle station of Citta the householder and sat on the prepared seats.

6. Then the householder Citta with his own hands served and satisfied the elder monks with porridge prepared out of milk and butter.

7. The elder monks, having partaken the meal, got up from their seats and went away. The householder Citta too, saying `Do what has to be done,' followed the elder monks close behind.

8. At that time it became very hot and the elder monks walked with shivering bodies, after partaking the meal.

9. At that time venerable Mahaka was the elder with the least number of rains. Then venerable Mahaka said to the elder monks: ßVenerable sirs, isn't it good if a cool wind blows with some thunder and a few drops of rain?û

ßMahaka, it is good if a cool wind blows with some thunder and a few drops of rain.û

10. Then venerable Mahaka made a supernormal intention for a cool wind to blow with some thunder and a few drops of rain.

11. Then it occurred to Citta the householder: This supernormal work is done by the elder with the least number of rains.

12. Venerable Mahaka while coming to the monastery said to the elder monks: ßVenerable sirs, is that much enough?û

ßFriend, Mahaka, this is enough! So much is done! Friend Mahaka is reverential!û

13. When the elder monks entered their dwelling venerable Mahaka too entered his dwelling.

14. Then the householder Citta approached venerable Mahaka, worshipped him and sat on a side.

15. Sitting on a side the householder Citta said to venerable Mahaka: ßVenerable sir, it is good if you would make visible psychic powers that are above human.û

ßIf so householder, spread your shawl in the terrace and make it show out heaping a bundle of grass on it.û

The householder Citta agreeing spread his shawl on the terrace and made it visible with a bundle of grass heaped on it.

16. Then venerable Mahaka entered his dwelling and touching the door knob intended a psychic intention and a tall flame like a palm burnt the grass without burning the shawl.

17. Then the householder Citta flapped his shawl and stood on a side with hairs standing on end.

18. Then venerable Mahaka came out of his dwelling and said to the householder, ßCitta is that enough!û

ßVenerable sir, Mahaka, this is enough! So much is done! Sir Mahaka you are reverential! Venerable Mahaka, be pleased to live in the Ambataka grove in Micchikasanda. I will attend to the needs of the venerable one and support you offering robes, morsel food, dwellings and requisites when ill.û

ßHouseholder, your words are good!û

19. Then venerable Mahaka arranged his dwelling and taking bowl and robes went away from Micchikasanda not to come back again.

40. 1. 5.
(5) Kàmabhå Ý Venerable Kamabhu

1. At one time venerable Kamabhu was living in the Ambataka grove in Macchikasanda.

2. Then the householder Citta approached venerable Kamabu worshipped and sat on a side.

3. To the householder Citta sitting on a side venerable Kamabu said: ßHouseholder, it is said,

Is faultless, covered in white,
Has one agreement, rolls on!
Look at him he is without confusion,
Has cut the stream and is not bound.

Householder, of this short exposition what is the detailed meaning?û

ßVenerable sir, are these the words of the Blessed One?û

ßHouseholder, they are the words of the Blessed Oneû

ßThen venerable sir, wait a moment until I recall the meaning.û

4. Then the householder Citta became silent for a moment and said: ßVenerable sir, faultless is a synonym for virtues. The white covering is a synonym for release. One agreement is a synonym for mindfulness. Rolls on is a synonym for going forward and backwards.

Venerable sir, chariot is a synonym for this body of four elements, produced by mother and father brought up with rice and bread and subjected to impermanence, brushing, breaking up and destruction

Venerable sir, greed, hate and delusion are destruction. The monk who has destroyed desires, has pulled out their roots, made them palm stumps and has made them things that would not grow in the future. Therefore the monk who has destroyed desires is not confused.

Venerable sir, the striving one is a synonym for the worthy one.

Venerable sir, flood is a synonym for craving, the monk without desires has dispelled craving pulled out the roots, made it a palm stump and has made it a thing that would not grow in the future. Therefore the monk who has dispelled craving, has cut the stream it is said.

Venerable sir, greed, hate and delusion are bonds. The monk who has destroyed desires, has pulled out their roots, made them palm stumps and has made them things that would not grow in the future. Therefore the monk who has destroyed desires is not bound it is said.

7. Therefore venerable sir, the Blessed One had said:

ßIs faultless, covered in white,
Has one agreement, rolls on!
Look at him he is without confusion,
Has cut the stream and is not boundû

Venerable sir, this is the detailed meaning of the short exposition of the Blessed One.

8. Householder, it is rare gain for you that your eye of wisdom sees through the deep words of the Blessed One.

40. 1. 6.
(6) Kàmabhå2 Ý Venerable Kamabkhu 2

1. At one time venerable Kamabhu was living in the Ambataka grove in Macchikasanda.

2. Then the householder Citta approached venerable Kamabu worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Then the householder Citta sitting on a side said to venerable Kamabhu: ßVenerable sir, how many determinations are there?û

ßHouseholder, there are three, such as bodily, verbal and mental determinations.û

4. ßVenerable sir, what are bodily determinations, what are verbal determinations and what are mental determinations?û

ßIn and out breathing are bodily determinations, thinking and pondering are verbal determinations and perceptions and feelings are mental determinationsû.

Householder Citta agreeing asked a further question.

5. ßVenerable sir, why are in and out breathing bodily determinations, why are reasoning and investigating verbal determinations and why are perceiving and feeling mental determinations?û

ßHouseholder, in and out breathing belongs to the body, are bound with the body, therefore in and out breathing is bodily determination. Householder, prior to speaking, someone reasons and investigates and breaks into words, therefore reasoning and investigating are verbal determinations. Perceiving and feeling is mental and bound with the mind, therefore perceptions and feelings are mental determinations.û .

Householder Citta agreeing asked a further question.

6. ßVenerable sir, how is the cessation of perceptions and feelings attained?û

ßHouseholder, to the monk attaining the cessation of perceptions and feelings it does not occur I will attain the cessation of perceptions and feelings or I have attained the cessation of perceptions and feelings. Yet his mind is earlier developed so that it is led up to it.

Householder Citta agreeing asked a further question.

7. ßVenerable sir, to the monk attaining the cessation of perceptions and feelings what things cease first, is it the bodily determination, the verbal determination or the mental determination?û

ßHouseholder, to the monk attaining the cessation of perceptions and feelings, the verbal determination ceases first, then the bodily determination and after that the mental determination.û

Householder Citta agreeing asked a further question.

8. ßVenerable sir, what is the difference between a dead person and the monk who has attained the cessation of perceptions and feelings?û .

ßHouseholder, of a dead person who has come to the end of life, the bodily determination has ceased and is put at ease, the verbal determination has ceased and is put at ease, the mental determination has ceased and is put at ease, lifespan has come to the end, the heat has extinguished and the mental faculties have broken up. Householder, of the monk attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings the bodily determination has ceased and is at ease, the verbal determination has ceased and is at ease, the mental determination has ceased and is at ease, lifespan has not come to the end, the heat has not extinguished and the mental faculties are very bright. This is the difference. between a dead person and of one attained to the cessation of perceptions and feelings. û

Householder Citta agreeing asked a further question.

9. ßVenerable sir, how is the rising from the cessation of perceptions and feelings?û

ßHouseholder, to the monk rising from the cessation of perceptions and feelings it does not occur I will rise from the cessation of perceptions and feelings or I have risen from the cessation of perceptions and feelings. Yet his mind is earlier developed so that it is lead up to it.

Householder Citta agreeing asked a further question.

10. ßVenerable sir, to the monk rising from the cessation of perceptions and feelings what things rise first, is it the bodily determination, the verbal determination or the mental determination?û

ßHouseholder, to the monk rising from the cessation of perceptions and feelings, the mental determination arises first, then the bodily determination and after that the verbal determination.û

Householder Citta agreeing asked a further question.

11. ßVenerable sir, what contacts touch the monk who rises from the cessation of perceptions and feelings?û

ßHouseholder, three contacts touch the monk who rises from the cessation of perceptions and feelings. The perceptions void, no sign and aimless, touch the monk who rises from the cessation of perceptions and feelings.û

Householder Citta agreeing asked a further question.

12. ßVenerable sir, what is the bent of mind of the monk rising from the cessation of perceptions and feelings?û

ßHouseholder, the mind of the monk rising from the cessation of perceptions and feelings has a gradual bent, sloping and decline to seclusion.

Householder Citta agreeing asked a further question.

13. ßVenerable sir, for how many things is the cessation of perceptions and feelings useful?û

ßHouseholder, you ask the question to be asked first in the end. Yet I will explain it to you. Householder it is very useful for two things, calm and insight.

40. 1. 7.
(7) Godatto Ý Venerable Godatta

1. At one time venerable Godatta was living in the Ambataka grove in Macchikasanda.

2. Then the householder Citta approached venerable Godatta worshipped and sat on a side.

3. To the householder Citta sitting on a side venerable Godatta said: ßHouseholder, the immeasurable release of mind, the release of mind in nothingness, the release of mind in the void and the release of mind in no sign, are they different in meaning and different in words or they the same in meaning and different in words?û

4. ßVenerable sir, there is a method in which these things are different in meaning and different in words. There is a method in which these things are the same in meaning and different in words.û

ßVenerable sir, what is the method in which these things are different in meaning and different in words?

5. Venerable sir, here the monk pervades one direction with thoughts of loving kindness, so too the second, the third, the fourth, so also above, below and across. He abides pervading the whole world, in all circumstances and respects with thoughts of loving kindness with an unbound mind made lofty and extensive without enmity and confusion. The monk pervades one direction with thoughts of compassion,  re  intrinsic joy,  re equanimity, so too the second, the third, the fourth, above, below and across. He abides pervading the whole world, in all circumstances and respects with equanimity with an unbound mind made lofty and extensive without enmity and confusion. Venerable sir, to this is called the immeasurable release of mind.

6. Venerable sir, what is the release of mind in nothingness? Here the monk overcoming all the sphere of consciousness, with there is nothing abides in the sphere of nothingness. Venerable sir, to this is called the release of mind in nothingness.

7. Venerable sir, what is the release of mind in the void?

Here the monk gone to the forest, to the root of a tree, or to an empty house reflects this is void of a self or the belongings of a self. Venerable sir, to this is called the release of mind in the void.

8. Venerable sir, what is the release without a sign?

Here the monk not attending to any sign concentrates without a sign. Venerable sir, to this is called the release of mind without a sign.

9. ßVenerable sir, this is the method in which these things are different in meaning and different in words

10. ßVenerable sir, what is the method in which these things are the same in meaning and different in words.

11. Venerable sir, greed is a measure, anger is a measure and delusion is a measure. They are dispelled to the monk who has no desires, have their roots pulled out, made them palm stumps and made not to grow in the future. Venerable sir, of all immeasurable releases of the mind the immovable release is the chief it is said. That immovable release of mind is void of greed, hate and delusion.

12. Venerable sir, greed is something, anger is something and delusion is something. They are dispelled to the monk who has no desires, have their roots pulled out, made them palm stumps and made not to grow in the future. Venerable sir, of all releases of the mind in nothingness, the immovable release is the chief it is said. That immovable release of mind is void of greed, hate and delusion.

13, Venerable sir, greed is a sign, anger is a sign and delusion is a sign. They are dispelled to the monk who has no desires, have their roots pulled out, made them palm stumps and made not to grow in the future. Venerable sir, of all releases of the mind, without a sign the immovable release is the chief it is said. That immovable release of mind is void of greed, hate and delusion.

14. Venerable sir, this is the method in which these things are the same in meaning and different in words.û

40. 1. 8.
(8) Nigaõtho Ý The Son of Nigaõñha

1. It happened in Macchikasanda.

2. At that time Nigaõñha Nàthaputta arrived in Macchikasanda with a large community of Nigaõñhas.

3. The householder Citta heard that Nigaõñha Nàthaputta had arrived in Macchikasanda with a large community of Nigaõñhas.

4. Then the householder Citta approached Nigaõñha Nàthaputta with a large gathering of lay disciples exchanged friendly greetings and sat on a side.

5. To the house holder Citta, sitting on a side Nigaõñha Nàthaputta said, ßHouseholder, do you believe in the recluse Gotama's concentration without reasoning and investigation and the concentration of the recluse Gotama in which reasoning and investigation cease?û

ßSir, I am not so close to the Blessed One to know this much yet there is concentration without reasoning and investigation and there is cessation of reasoning and investigating.û .

6. When this was said, NNigaõñha Nàthaputta looked at his gathering and said: ßLook! This good householder Citta is straightforward, without longing and honest that he should oppress even the wind with a net, or think to oppress, thinking the cessation of reasoning and investigating, which is like thinking to stop the source of river Ganges with the fist.û

7. ßSir, what do you think is more excellent, knowledge or faith??

ßHouseholder, faith with knowledge is more excellent.û

8. ßVenerable sir, when desired I seclude the mind from sensuality and demerit with reasoning and investigation and with pleasant joy born from seclusion, abide in the first high stage of mind. Venerable sir, when desired I overcome reasoning and investigation and with pleasant joy born from concentration abide in the second high stage of mind. Venerable sir, when desired with equanimity to joy and impartiality  re  abide in the third high stage of mind. Venerable sir, when desired I dispel pleasant and unpleasant states and  re fourth high stage of mind. Venerable sir, why should I, knowing and seeing thus, rely on the faith of other recluses and Brahmins, there is concentration without reasoning and investigation and there is cessation of reasoning and investigation. .

9. When this was said, NNigaõñha Nàthaputta looked away from his gathering and said: ßLook! This good householder Citta is not straightforward, with longing and not honest.û

ßVenerable sir, now itself you said these words, `Look, this good householder Citta is straightforward, without longing and honest' and now itself you say `Look, this good householder Citta is not straightforward, with longing and not honest''

10. Sir, if the words you said earlier are true, the words you said later are not true, if the words you said earlier are not true, the words you said later are true. Sir, there are these ten rightful inquiries common to all co-religious beliefs. When you know their meanings, you and this gathering of Nigaõñhas will be rightfully accused. It's one question one exposition and one explanation, two questions two expositions and two explanations, three questions three expositions and three explanations, four questions four expositions and four explanations, five questions five expositions and five explanations, six questions six expositions and six explanations seven questions seven expositions and seven explanations, eight questions eight expositions and eight explanations, nine questions nine expositions and nine explanations, ten questions ten expositions and ten explanations.

11. The householder Citta making these ten inquiries from Nigaõñha Nàthaputta getting up from his seat went away.

40. 1. 9.
(9) Acela Ý Without Clothes

1. It happened in Macchikasanda.

2. At that time Acela Kassapa, a lay associate of the householder Citta arrived in Macchikasanda.

3. The householder Citta heard that his earlier lay associate had arrived in Macchikasanda. Then the householder Citta approached Acela Kassapa exchanged friendly greetings and sat on a side.

4. The house holder Citta, sitting on a side said to Acela Kassapa: ßVenerable sir, for how many years have you led the holy life?û

ßHouseholder, I led the holy life for about thirty years.û

5. ßVenerable sir, in these thirty years have you attained some noble vision above human, some freedom from trouble?û

ßHouseholder, in these thirty years I have not attained any noble vision above human, some freedom from trouble, other than nudity, a shaven head and a set of tools to pull out hairs.û

6. When this was said, the householder Citta said to Acela Kassapa: ßWonderful and surprising is this well declared Teaching that in these thirty years you have not attained some noble vision above human, some freedom from trouble, other than nudity, a shaven head and a set of tools to pull out hairs.û

7. ßHouseholder, for how long have you been a lay disciple?û

ßVenerable sir, I too have been a lay disciple for thirty yearsû

8. ßHouseholder, in these thirty years have you attained some noble vision above human, some freedom from trouble?û

ßVenerable sir, when desired I seclude the mind from sensuality and demerit and with reasoning and investigating and with pleasant joy born from seclusion, abide in the first high stage of mind. Venerable sir, when desired I overcome reasoning and investigating and without reasoning and investigating and with pleasant joy born from concentration abide in the second high stage of mind. Venerable sir, when desired with equanimity to joy and impartiality  re  abide in the third high stage of mind. Venerable sir, when desired I dispel pleasant and unpleasant states and  re fourth high stage of mind. Venerable sir, if I pass away before the passing away of the Blessed One, it is no wonder, he would declare, `the householder Citta has not those bonds binding him to this world to return here.'.û

9. When this was said Acela Kassapa said to the householder Citta: ßWonderful and surprising is this well declared Teaching that a lay disciple wearing white clothes should attain these noble visions above human, this freedom from trouble. I should gain the going forth and the higher ordination in this dispensation.û

10. Then the householder Citta approached the elder monks with Acela Kassapa and said to them: ßVenerable sirs, this is an earlier co-associate of mine. May the elder monks give him the going forth and the higher ordination. I will attend on him offering robes, morsel food, dwellings and requisites when ill.û

11. Acela Kassapa obtained the going forth and the higher ordination in this dispensation and venerable Kassapa withdrawing from the crowd and abiding diligent to dispel with time attained the noble end of the holy life here and now and abode. Sons of clansmen rightfully go forth from the household realize it by themselves and abide. He knew birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end, duties are done, there is nothing more to wish.

12. Venerable Kassapa became a worthy one.

40. 1. 10.
(10) Gilànadassanaü Ý Seeing the Sick

1. It happened in Macchikasanda.

2. At that time the householder Citta was gravely ill in unpleasantness.

3. At that time many orchard gods, forest gods, tree gods and gods claiming mastery over grass, medicinal herbs and trees got together and said to the householder Citta: ßHouseholder, make a resolve to be the future Universal Monarch!û

When this was said, the householder Citta said to the many orchard gods, forest gods, tree gods and gods claiming mastery over grass, medicinal herbs and trees: ßThat too is impermanent, changes and have to be left behind.û

4. Hearing these words, the householder Citta's friends, co-associates, relations and blood relations said: ßNoble master, arouse mindfulness. Do not talk confusedly.û

ßWhat have I told you, to tell me, Noble master, arouse mindfulness? Do not talk confusedly.û

ßNoble master, you said, `That too is impermanent, changes and have to be left behind'.û

ßThat, I said to the many orchard gods, forest gods, tree gods and gods claiming mastery over grass, medicinal herbs and trees. They got together and said to me, `Householder, make a resolve to be the future Universal Monarch'

5ßNoble master, seeing what good did the many orchard gods, forest gods, tree gods and gods claiming mastery over grass, medicinal herbs and trees get together and tell you, `Householder, make a resolve to be the future Universal Monarch'.û

ßIt occurred to those many orchard gods, forest gods, tree gods and gods claiming mastery over grass, medicinal herbs and trees, this householder, Citta is virtuous, a good friend and they recollected if he makes a resolve to be the future Universal Monarch, his aspiration will be successful, as it will be the rightful fruit of a virtuous one and they said . `Householder, make a resolve to be the future Universal Monarch' To them I said `That too is impermanent, changes and have to be left behind'

6. ßNoble master, if that is so, advice us too.û

ßYou should train in this manner: We will develop unwavering faith in the Enlightened One. `The Blessed One is worthy, rightfully enlightened, is endowed with knowledge and conduct, has gone in the right direction, knows the worlds, has become the incomparable tamer of those to be tamed, is Teacher of gods and men, enlightened and blessed.' Develop unwavering faith in the Teaching! `The Blessed One's Teaching is well proclaimed, the results are here and now, time does not matter, invites inspection, leads inwards and should be realized by the wise by themselves.' Develop unwavering faith in the Community of monks! `The Community of monks of the Blessed One have gone in the right direction, in the straightforward direction in the wise direction and gone with mutual understanding. They are the four pairs of eight Great Men who are sacrificial, worthy of hospitality, offerings and suitable for devotional worship with clasped hands. They are the incomparable field of merit for the world.' If there is any unshared wealth in the clan, share them with virtuous good friends,

You should train in this manner.û

7. Then the householder Citta advising his friends, co-associates, relations and blood relations to arouse faith in the Enlightened One, Teaching and the Community of monks and rousing them to be benevolent passed off.