Dharmapada Sutra

Reference is made to 'The Dhammapada' by Narada Thera)
CHAPTERS
1. Couplets
2. Watchfulness
3. Mind
4. Flowers
5. Fools
6. The Wise
7. The Worthy
8. Thousands
9. Evil
10. Punishment
11. Old Age
12. Self
13. The World
14. The Buddha
15. Happiness
16. Affection
17. Anger
18. Impurities
19. The Righteousness
20. The Path
21. Miscellaneous
22. Woeful State
23. Elephant
24. Craving
25. The Bhikshu
26. The Brahmin


Chapter 1 Couplets
1. Mind is the forerunner of (all evil) states. Our life is the creation of our mind. If one speaks or acts with impure mind, suffering follows one as the wheel of the cart follows the draught-ox that draws the cart. (1)
2. Mind is the forerunner of (all good) states. Our life is the creation of our mind. If one speaks or acts with pure mind, happiness follows one as his own shadows that never leaves. (2)
3. "He insulted me, he hurt me, he defeated me, and he deprived me". Those who harbor such thoughts will not be free from hatred. (3)
4. "He insulted me, he hurt me, he defeated me, and he deprived me". Those who do not harbor such thoughts will be free from hatred. (4)
5. Hatred never ceases through hatred in this world, but ceases through not hating only. This is an eternal law. (5)
6. Many people do not know that we perish in quarrels. Those who realize it do not quarrel with each other. (6)
7. Whoever lives for pleasures, with unrestrained sensual desires and with excessive food are idle and lack of virtues. He is over-powered by Mara, just as a weak tree is blown over by the wind. (7)
8. Whoever lives not for pleasures, with restrained sensual desires and with moderate food is in good faith and full of virtues. He is not over-powered by Mara, just as a rocky mountain is not shaken by the wind. (8)
9. Whoever is impure without self-control and truthfulness, not worthy of the pure yellow robe that he wears. (9)
10. Whoever is pure, well established in morals and endowed with self -control and truthfulness, is worthy of the pure yellow robe that he wears. (10)
11. What is unessential they regard as essential, and what is essential they regard as unessential; they shall never realize the truth, and get lost in the path of false thinking. (11)
12. What is essential they regard as essential, and what is unessential they regard as unessential; they shall realize the truth and keep on in the path of right thinking. (12)
13. Even as rain leaks into a poorly roof house, so passions will penetrate an uncultivated mind. (13)
14. Even as rain does not leak into a well-roofed house, so passions will not penetrate a cultivated mind. (14)
15. Here he grieves, and hereafter he grieves. The man who does evil suffers in both cases. He grieves, and he is afflicted perceiving the impurities of his own deeds. (15)
16. Here he rejoices, and hereafter he rejoices. The man who does good rejoices in both cases. He rejoices, and exceedingly rejoices perceiving the purity of his own deeds. (16)
17. Here he suffers, and hereafter he suffers. The man who does evil suffers in both cases. "I have done evil", (thinking thus) he suffers. Furthermore, he suffers on the path of suffering. (17)
18. Here he is happy, and hereafter he is happy. The man who does good rejoices in both cases. "I have done good", (thinking thus), he is happy. Furthermore, he is happy on the path of joy. (18)
19. If a man recites the holy books, but does not practice accordingly, this thoughtless man cannot share the enjoyment of the holy life. He is like a cowherd who counts the cows of others. (19)
20. Whereas if a man recites only a few words in the holy books, and practices in according with the teaching. He is free from passion, hate and illusions-with right vision and a mind free, clinging to nothing here and hereafter, he shares the enjoyment of the holy life. (20)

Chapter 2 Watchfulness
1. Vigilance is the path to immorality; negligence is the path of death. Those who are vigilant never die; those who are negligent are already as dead. (21)
2. Those who have the knowledge of vigilance rejoice being vigilant and are delighted in the realm of the Ariyas. (22)
3. And those who meditate constantly, and contemplate deeply with striving diligence, realize and attain the supreme Nirvana. (23)
4. One who is energetic, mindful, pure in deed, considerate, self-controlled, right living shall arise in glory. (24)
5. By substained effort, earnestness, discipline, and self-control, the wise makes an island for himself, which no flood overwhelms. (25)
6. One who is ignorant and foolish is never vigilant. The wise man who lives in vigilance considers it as his greatest treasure. (26)
7. Do not indulge in negligence; do not have intimacy with sensuous delights. The vigilant one in earnest meditation obtains abundant bliss. (27)
8. When a wise man discards negligence by vigilance, ascends to the palace of wisdom and gazes upon the sorrowing people, he is free from suffering, even as a wise man on a mountain peak views many unwise people on the plain. (28)
9. Vigilant amongst the negligent, awake amongst those sleeping, the wise man like a swift horse runs his race, outrunning the slow ones behind. (29)
10. Maghava (or Indra) became the chief of the gods by vigilance. Vigilance is ever praised; negligence is ever despised. (30)
11. The Bhikshu who delights in vigilance and looks with fear on negligence goes on his path like fire, burning all obstacles both great and small. (31)
12. The Bhikshu who delights in vigilance and looks with fear on negligence, is not liable to fall away. He is in the presence of Nirvana. (32)

Chapter 3 Mind
1. The mind is flickering and restless, difficult to guard, difficult to control. The wise person straightens his mind as a fletcher straightens an arrow. (33)
2. Like a fish that is drawn from water and thrown on dry land, the mind strives and struggles to escape from the realm of passions. (34)
3. The mind is hard to check, swifting and alighting wherever it likes. It is good to master this mind. A disciplined mind is conducive to happiness. (35)
4. The mind is very hard to perceive, extremely subtle, alighting wherever it likes. A wise man guards his mind. A guarded mind is conducive to happiness. (36)
5. The mind travels afar, wanders alone, is incorporeal, lies in a cave. Those who subdue it are liberated from the bond of Mara. (37)
6. He whose mind is unsteady, who knows not the true doctrine, whose faith wavers - the wisdom of such a person will never be perfect. (38)
7. He whose mind is free from the lust of desires, which is not influenced by hatred, who has transcended both good and evil - for such an awakened person has no fear. (39)
8. Realizing that this body is as fragile as a jar, and establishing this mind as firm as a fortress, he should attack Mara with the weapon of wisdom. He should guard his conquests, without attachment to it. (40)
9. For before long, how sad! This body will lie upon the ground, cast aside, devoid of consciousness, like a useless charred log. (41)
10. Whatever an enemy may harm an enemy, and whatever a hateful man may harm another hateful one, but a man's own mind, if wrongly directed, can do him far greater harm. (42)
11. A mother or father, or any other relative can indeed do good to a man, but a man's own mind, if correctly directed, can do him far greater good. (43)

Chapter 4 Flowers
1. Who will conquer this earth and this realm of Yama, and this world together with devas? Who will gather well-expressed words of truth in the Path of Virtue, even as an expert (garland-maker) gathers flowers? (44)
2. A trainee disciple will conquer this earth and this realm of Yama, and this world together with devas. A trainee disciple will gather well-expressed words of truth in the Path of Virtue, even as an expert (garland-maker) gathers flowers. (45)
3. Knowing that this body is like foam, and realizing its mirage-nature, one should destroy the sharp arrows of Mara, concealed in the flowers of sensuous passions, and pass beyond the sight of the King of Death. (46)
4. Death carries away the man who gathers flowers (of sensual pleasure), and whose mind is distracted, as a great flood sweeps away a sleeping village. (47)
5. And death, the end of all, overpowers the man who gathers flowers (of sensual pleasure), whose mind is distracted, and who is thirty for desires. (48)
6. As a bee without damaging the flower, its color or scent, flies away and collecting only the honey, even so the sage wanders in the village. (49)
7. Do not seek others' faults, or what others have done or not done, think what you yourself have done and have not done. (50)
8. Like a flower that is lovely and beautiful, but has no scent, even well spoken word hear no fruit is one who does not practice it. (51)
9. Like a flower that is lovely and beautiful and also has scent, even so well-spoken words bear fruit in one who practices it. (52)
10. As from a heap of flowers, many garlands and wreaths can be made; many good deeds can be done by a mortal being. (53)
11. The scent of flowers does not go against the wind; not sandalwood, not tagara, not jasmine. But the scent of the virtuous does go against the wind; the scent of virtues perfumes all directions. (54)
12. Sandalwood, tagara, lotus, jasmine - even among all these kinds of fragrance, the perfume of virtue is by far the best. (55)
13. The fragrance of tagara or sandal is but slight; the fragrance of virtuous people is supreme, which blows even amongst the gods. (56)
14. There is no way for Mara to find the path of those who are virtuous, vigilant in living, and are liberated by right knowledge. (57)
15-16. Just as a fragrant, lovely lotus grows from a heap of rubbish thrown on the road, so does a disciple of the Fully Enlightened One shine pure light of wisdom in the midst of blind mortal. (58-59)

Chapter 5 Fools
1. The night is long for the wakeful, the road is long for the weary, Samsara is long for the foolish who do not know the Sublime Truth. (60)
2. The disciple who travels along cannot find a companion better or equal, let him firmly pursue his solitary career. There is no companionship with the foolish. (61)
3. "I have sons, I have wealth" - the fool troubles himself. Even one's self is not one's own, how then sons, how then wealth? (62)
4. The fool who knows that he is a fool is for that very reason a wise man; the fool who thinks that he is wise is called a fool indeed. (63)
5. Though a fool lives with a wise man through all his life, he never understands the Dharma, just as a spoon never knows the taste of soup. (64)
6. Though an intelligent person lives with a wise man for only a moment, he quickly understands the Dharma, just as a tongue knows the taste of soup. (65)
7. A fool who thinks he is wise acts as the enemy to himself, doing evil deeds that in the end bear bitter fruits. (66)
8. That deed is not well done when being done, one repents. Weeping with tears, one reaps the bitter fruits of the wrong deed thereof. (67)
9. But that deed is indeed well done when being done, one has not to repent. Rejoicing with pleasure, one reaps the sweet fruits of the right deed thereof. (68)
10. As long as it has not borne fruit, the fool thinks the fruit is as sweet as honey, but when the bitter fruit of evil deed ripens, then he comes to grief. (69)
11. Month after month a fool may fast by eating only as much food as can be picked up on the tip of a Kusa grass blade, yet his worth is not a sixteenth part of that of the wise man who have comprehended the Truth. (70)
12. The effect of an evil deed does not come immediately, just as fresh milk does not turn sour at once. It follows the fool, like fire covered by ashes. (71)
13. Whatever the fool gains, knowledge and fame will ruin himself. It destroys the fool's virtue, going to his head. (72)
14. The fool will desire undeserved reputation, precedence among the monks, authority in monasteries, and honor amongst other groups. (73)
15. Let both laymen and monks think, "This I have done, and let them refer me in every work, no matter great or small". Such are the ambition of the fool. This desire and pride increase. (74)
16. Surely, the Bhikshus, the disciple of the Buddha, understands the path that leads to worldly wealth and another path that leads to Nirvana. They should not rejoice in worldly honor, but cultivate for detachment. (75)

Chapter 6 The Wise
1. If one looks upon a wise man who points out faults as a revealer of hidden treasures, one should associate with a wise man. (76)
2. Let the wise man advise, instruct and restrain one from evil. He will be truly pleased by those who are good, and displeased by those who are not. (77)
3. Do not associate with evil friends, and do not associate with mean men. Do associate with good friends and do associate with noblemen. (78)
4. He drinks of the Dharma and abides in happiness. The wise man ever delights in the Dharma revealed by the Ariyas. (79)
5. Irrigators guide water in channelling, fletchers make the arrows straight in bending, carpenters control the timber in cutting. The wise control their own minds. (80)
6. As a solid rock is not shaken by the wind, the wise are not moved by praise or blame. (81)
7. Just as a deep lake is clear and still, the wise become exceedingly peaceful when they hear the Dharma. (82)
8. The good give up attachment for everything. The sagely do not speak idle words on sensual craving. Whenever they are affected by happiness or by pain, the wise show neither elation nor depression. (83)
9. Neither for the sake of oneself nor for the sake of another, he should not desire son, wealth, or kingdom by unrighteous means. By unrighteous means, he should not seek his own success. Then, such a person is indeed virtuous, wise and righteous. (84)
10. Few people amongst men can reach the Beyond (Nirvana); the rest of mankind only runs along the shore. (85)
11. For those who act properly according to the teaching, and explain correctly the truth, they will reach the Beyond (Nirvana) crossing the realm of passions, which is hard to cross over. (86)
12-13. Leaving behind the path of darkness and cultivating the path of brightness, let the wise man leave his home life and go into a life without home. He should seek great delight in detachment, which is difficult to enjoy. Giving up the sensual pleasure with no hindrance, the wise man should cleanse himself of the impurities of the mind. (87-88)
14. For those whose mind is properly cultivated in the Limbs of Perfect Enlightenment, who have no attachment and enjoy in giving up of grasping, and who are free from the corruption, and shine pure in a radiance of light, then attain Nirvana even in this mortal world. (89)

Chapter 7 The Worthy
1. For those who have completed the journey, left sorrow behind, being completely free from everything and destroyed all bondage, the fever of passion does not exist. (90)
2. The mindful people exert themselves, and do not like to remain in the same place. Like swans that leave their pools and go home after home. (91)
3. For those who have no accumulation, who eat the right food of life, and who have deliverance that is void and signless, they are the objects in the path that cannot be traced, like birds flying in the air. (92)
4. For those whose corruptions are destroyed, who are not attached to food, and who has deliverance that is void and signless, they are the objects in the path that cannot be traced, like birds flying in the sky. (93)
5. For those who subdue their senses, like the charioteers trained and controlled their horses, and who destroy their pride and is free from the corruptions, they are admired even by the gods. (94)
6. A balanced and well-disciplined person does not resent like the earth. He is comparable to an Indakhila, (i.e. a firm column). He is not sullied by mud like a pool. He does not wander (in Samsara) for such a balanced life. (95)
7. His mind is calm. His speech is calm. His action is calm. He knows correctly that he is completely freed, perfectly peaceful and steadily balanced. (96)
8. For a man who is free from credulous beliefs, who understands the eternal, Nirvana, who cuts off the links, who has put an end to occasion (of good and evil), and who eschews all desires, he is indeed a supreme man. (97)
9. Wherever the Arhats dwell in a village or in a forest, in a valley or on a hill, that spot is a place of delight. (98)
10. Forests are delightful where other people do not because the one who is free from passion rejoices therein seeking no sensual pleasure. (99)

Chapter 8 Thousands
1. Better than a thousand useless words is one single beneficial word, by hearing which, one is pacified. (100)
2. Better than a thousand useless verses is one beneficial single verse, by hearing which, one is pacified. (101)
3. Should one recites a hundred useless verses, better is one single word of the Dharma, by hearing which, one is pacified. (102)
4. Though one conquers a million people in battle, he is the noblest victor who has conquered himself. (103)
5-6. Self-conquest is indeed, far greater than the conquest of all other people; neither a god nor a Gandhabba nor Mara with Brahma can win back the victory of such a person who is self-subdued and self-disciplined. (104-105)
7. Even if one makes an offering a thousand times every month for a hundred years, if one honors a sage who has perfected himself, for even a moment, that honor is better than what is sacrificed in a century. (106)
8. Even if one tends the (sacred) fire in the forest for a hundred years, if one honors a sage who has perfected himself, for even a moment, that honor is better than what is sacrificed in a century. (107)
9. Whatever gift or alms are offered for a year in this world in order to seek merit, all of that is less than a single quarter of the reverence towards the upright people. (108)
10. For one who is in the habit of constantly honoring and respecting the elders, one's four blessings increase - age, beauty, bliss and strength. (109)
11. It is better to have a single day in one's life, which is moral and meditative, than to have a hundred years in one's life, which is immoral and uncontrolled. (110)
12. It is better to have a single day in one's life, which is wise and meditative, than to have a hundred years in one's life, which is without wisdom and control. (111)
13. It is better to have a single day in one's life, which makes an internse effort than to have a hundred year in one's life, which is idle and inactive. (112)
14. It is better to have a single day in one's life, which comprehends how all things rise and pass away, than to have one hundred years in one's life, which does not comprehend how all things rise and pass away. (113)
15. It is better to have a single day in one's life, which sees one's own immorality, than to have one hundred years in one's life, which does not see one's own immortality. (114)
16. It is better to have a single day in one's life, which sees the ultimate truth, than to have a hundred years in one's life, which does not see the ultimate truth. (115)

Chapter 9 Evil
1. Make haste in doing good and check your mind from evil. If a man is slow in doing meritorious actions, his mind delights in evil. (116)
2. Should a man commits evil, he should not do it again and again. He should not find pleasure therein, because accumulation of evil is painful. (117)
3. Should a man performs a meritorious action, he should do it again and again. He should find pleasure therein because accumulation of merits is blissful. (118)
4. Even one who is evil sees good as long as the evil has not developed, but when the evil has developed, one sees the evil results. (119)
5. Even one who is good sees evil as long as the good has not developed, but when the good has developed, one sees the good results. (120)
6. Do not disregard evil, saying "It will not come close to me". The falling of drops of water will in time fill a water jar. Even so the fool fills himself with evil by gathering it little by little. (121)
7. Do not disregard merit, saying "It will not come close to me". The falling of drops of water will in time fill a water jar. Even so the wise man fills himself with good by gathering it little by little. (122)
8. Just as a merchant, with a small escort but great wealth, avoids a dangerous route, let a man who desires to live avoid drinking poison and the dangers of evil. (123)
9. If there is no wound in one's hand, one may carry poison in it. Poison does not affect one who has no wound. There is no evil for one who does none. (124)
10. If anyone offends an innocent person, the evil of that will come back to that fool, like fine dust thrown against the wind. (125)
11. Some are born in a womb. Those who are evil are born in evil realms. People whose conduct is good go to heaven. People who are free from defilement enter Nirvana. (126)
12. There is nowhere on earth - not in the sky, nor in the sea, nor in a mountain cave, that one may escape from the effects of one's evil deed. (127)
13. There is nowhere on earth - not in the sky, nor in the sea, nor in a mountain cave, that one will not be overcome by death. (128)

Chapter 10 Punishment
1. All tremble at the rod. All fear death. Comparing others with oneself, one should neither kill nor cause to kill. (129)
2. All tremble at the rod. Life is dear to all. Comparing others with oneself, one should neither kill nor cause to kill. (130)
3. Whoever, seeking his own happiness, hurts with the rod other living beings who all want happiness will not experience happiness hereafter. (131)
4. Whoever, seeking his own happiness, does not hurt other living beings who all want happiness will experience happiness hereafter. (132)
5. Do not speak harsh words, because once spoken will retort to you. Angry words are painful. There may be blows for blows that cause retaliation. (133)
6. If you keep silence like a broken gong, you have already attained Nirvana. No vindictiveness will be found in you. (134)
7. As a cowherd drives his cattle to pasture with a rod, even so do old age and death drive out the lives of beings. (135)
8. When a fool commits evil deeds; he does not realize that he is tormented by his own deeds, like one burnt by fire. (136)
9-12. Whoever hurts with his rod those who are harmless, will soon come to one of these ten states: acute pain disaster, body injury, grievous sickness, loss of mind, oppression by the king, heavy accusation, lose of relatives, destruction of wealth, ravaging fire that will burn his house, to be born in hell when his body dissolves. (137-140)
13. Neither nakedness, nor matted hair, nor filth, nor fasting, nor lying on the ground, nor dust and dirt, nor striving squatting on the heels, can purify a mortal who has not overcome doubts and desires. (141)
14. Though a man may wear fine clothing, if he lives peacefully, subdues his passion, control his senses, has faith, is perfectly pure, lays aside the rod towards all living beings, he is a Brahman, an ascetic, a monk called Bhikkhu. (142)
15. It is rare to find anyone in this world restrained by modesty, who avoids reproach, just as a good horse needs no whipping. (143)
16. Like a good horse, touched by the whip, be strenuous and zealous by faith, by virtue, by effort, by concentration, by studying the truth, by being endowed with knowledge and conduct and by being mindful, one shall get rid of this great suffering. (144)
17. Irrigators guide water in chanelling, the fletchers make the arrows straight in bending, the carpenters control the timber in cutting, the virtuous control themselves. (145)

Chapter 11 Old Age
1. What is laughter, what is joy, when the world is ever burning? When you are in deep darkness, would you not seek the light? (146)
2. Consider this beautiful body! It is a mass of sores, diseased, full of imaginations. It is never permanent, for ever changing. (147)
3. This body is decaying! A nest of diseases, perishable. This putrid mass breaks up. Truly life ends in death. (148)
4. Look at these grey white dried bones, like gourds cast away in autumn. What pleasure is there in looking at them? (149)
5. This body is made of bones covered with flesh and blood. Herein are stored decay, death, conceit and detraction. (150)
6. Even ornamented royal chariots wear out, so the body reaches old age too. However, the Dharma of good virtues never grows old. Thus, teach the good to those who are good. (151)
7. If a man does not learn, he grows old just like an ox! His muscles grow, but his wisdom does not. (152)
8. I wandered in Samsara through many a birth, seeking but not finding the builder of the house of life and death. It is sorrowful to be born again and again. (153)
9. O house-builder, you have been seen! You will not rebuild again. Your framing is all broken, and your ridgepole is destroyed. My mind has attained the unconditioned without any attachment. The end of carving is also achieved. (154)
10. Those who have not led the Holy Life, and who have not acquired wealth in their youth, pine away, like old herons at a pond without fish. (155)
11. Those who have not led the Holy Life, who have not acquired wealth in their youth, lie like worn-out bows, sighing after the past. (156)

Chapter 12 Self
1. If one holds oneself dear, one should protect oneself well. Of the three watches of his times, the wise man keeps a vigil. (157)
2. Let one first establish oneself in what is proper, and then instruct others. Such a wise man will not be defiled. (158)
3. If he makes himself as what he instructs others to be, then he can teach others in truth. Self-control is indeed difficult. (159)
4. Only a man himself can be the savior of himself, who else from outside could be his savior? With oneself controlled, one obtains a savior that is difficult to find. (160)
5. Any evil done by a man is born in himself and is caused by himself; and this crushes the unwise man as a diamond grinds a weaker stone. (161)
6. And, a man who is exceeding corrupt, is just like a maluva creeper strangling a sal tree; and the man is brought down to that condition in which his own enemy would wish him to be. (162)
7. It is easy to do things that are wrong and not beneficial to oneself, but is very difficult, indeed, to do things that are good and beneficial. (163)
8. On account of his false views, the stupid man scorns the teachings of the Arhats, the Nobles Ones, and the Righteous. He gathers fruits for his destruction, like the Kashta reed whose fruits mean its death. (164)
9. By oneself the evil is done, and it is oneself who suffers: by oneself the evil is not done, and by one's self one becomes pure. Purity and impurity depend on oneself. No one can purify another. (165)
10. For the sake of others' welfare, let one do not neglect one's own welfare, no matter how great. Clearly perceiving one's own welfare, let one be intent on one's own goal. (166)

Chapter 13 & The World
1. Do not serve base desires. Do not live in heedlessness. Do not embrace false views. Do not sink into the world. (167)
2. Arise, do not be negligent in standing (at people's doors for alms). Observe and practice the principle of good conduct. One who observes this practice lives happily in this world, and beyond. (168)
3. Practice the principle of good conduct, not evil conduct. One who observes this practice lives happily in this world, and beyond. (169)
4. When one looks upon this world as a bubble, as a mirage, one is not seen by the King of Death. (170)
5. Come and look at this world. It is like an ornamented royal chariot, wherein fools sink, but the wise men do not attach to it. (171)
6. Whoever was unwise in early days but later became wise, illumines this world, like that of the moon when free from clouds. (172)
7. Whoever overcomes the evil he has done with the good he does afterward, illumines this world, like that of the moon when free from clouds. (173)
8. This world is blind (in darkness). Few are those who clearly see. Just as few birds can escape from a net, few can go to a blissful state. (174)
9. Swans follow the path of the sun. (Men) go through air by psychic powers. Wise men who have conquered Mara and his host are led away from the world (without coming into birth again). (175)
10. There is no evil that cannot be done by the liar, who has transgressed the law (of truthfulness), and who is indifferent to a world beyond. (176)
11. Certainly, misers do not go to the celestial realms. Fools do not indeed praise liberality. The wise man rejoices in giving and thereby becomes happy thereafter. (177)
12. Better than absolute sovereignty over the earth, better than going to heaven, better than even lordship over all the worlds is the fruit of a Stream-Winner. (178)

Chapter 14 The Buddhas
1. By what worldly path could you lead the Buddha, who, enjoying all, can go through the pathless ways of infinite range? The Buddha is the one whose conquest (of passion) is not turned into defeat, and whom no one can conquer. (179)
2. By what worldly path could you lead the Buddha, who, enjoying all, can go through the pathless way of infinite range? The Buddha is the one whom there is not that entangling, embroiling, craving to lead (to any life) (180)
3. The wise ones who are intent on meditation, who delight in the peace of renunciation (i.e. Nirvana), even the gods hold dear such mindful perfect Buddhas. (181)
4. Birth is rare as a human being. The life of mortals is hard. Hearing of the Sublime Truth is hard. The appearance of the Buddhas is rare. (182)
5. Do not do any evil. Do cultivate good. Do purify one's mind - this is the teaching of the Buddha. (183)
6. Forbearing patience is the highest sacrifice. Nirvana is supreme. This say the Buddhas. If a man hurts another, he is not a recluse. If a man oppresses another, he is not an ascetic. (184)
7. Not insulting, not harming, restraint according to the Fundamental Moral Code, moderation in food, secluded abode, intent on higher consciousness - this is the teaching of the Buddhas. (185)
8-9. Contentment in sensual pleasures does not arise by a shower of gold coins. Sensual pleasures are of little sweetness and pain. Knowing thus, the wise man finds no delight even in heavenly pleasures. The disciple of the Fully Enlightened One delights in the destruction of craving. (186-187)
10-11. Men compelled by fear go to many a refuge - to hills, woods, groves, trees and shrines. But those are not safe refuge, and no such refuge is supreme. One is not freed from an ill by resorting to such a refuge. (188-189)
12-14. The one who has gone for refuge to the Buddhas, the Dharma and the Sangha, sees with the right knowledge, the Four Noble Truths - Suffering, the Cause of Suffering, the Transcending of Suffering, and the Cessation of Suffering, which are led by the Noble Eightfold Paths. This is indeed secure refuge. This is indeed supreme refuge. By seeking such refuge, one is released from all suffering. (190-192)
15. It is hard to find a man of great wisdom: such a man is not born everywhere. Where such a wise man is born, that family thrives happily. (193)
16. Happy is the birth of Buddhas. Happy is the teaching of the Sublime Dharma. Happy is the unity of the Sangha. Happy is the discipline of the united ones. (194)
17-18. He who pays reverence to those worthy of reverence, whether the Buddhas or their disciples, who has overcome the impediments and has got rid of grief and sorrow - his merit of paying reverence to such peaceful and fearless ones cannot be measured by anyone as such and such. (195)

Chapter 15. Happiness
1. O let us live happily without hate amongst those who hate! Among men who hate, we dwell without hate. (197)
2. O let us live happily in good health amongst those who are ill! Among men who are ill, we dwell in good health. (198)
3. O let us live happily without craving (to sensual pleasures) amongst those who crave. Among men who crave, we dwell without craving. (199)
4. O let us live happily without impediments. Let us feed on joy, like the gods of the Radiant Realm. (200)
5. Victory breeds hatred. The defeated live in pain. Giving up victory and defeat, one will live in peace and happiness. (201)
6. There is no fire like lust, no evil like hate. There is no ill like the body (disharmony of the five Skandhas), no bliss higher than Nirvana. (202)
7. Hunger is the greatest disease. Skandhas are the greatest illness. Knowing this as it really is, (the wise man realizes) Nirvana, the supreme bliss. (203)
8. Health is the highest gain. Contentment is the greatest wealth. The trusty ones are the best friends. Nirvana is the highest bliss. (204)
9. When a man tastes the flavor of seclusion and the flavor of quietness, he is then free from anguish and stain, enjoying the taste of the Dharma. (205)
10. It is the joy to see the Ariyas, and to be with them is ever happy. If one were never to see the foolish, one may ever be happy. (206)
11. Certainly, one moves in company with fools grieves for a long time, and is ever painful as with a foe. It is happy to be associated with the wise, even like the joy of meeting a beloved kinsman. (207)
12. Therefore, if you find a man who is intelligent, wise, learned, enduring, responsible, and being Ariya, you should associate with a man of such virtue and intellect, just like the moon (follows) the path of stars. (208)

Chapter 16 Affection
1. One who does what should not be done, and fails to do what should be done, who gives up the quest and pursues the sensual pleasures, will envy the people who devote themselves in cultivation of Way. (209)
2. Never cling to what is dear and what is not dear. Not seeing what is dear and seeing what is not dear, are both painful. (210)
3. Hence hold nothing dear, for separation from what is dear is bad. There are no bonds for those to whom nothing is dear or not dear. (211)
4. Grief arises from what is dear; fear arises from what is dear. For someone who is wholly free from endearment, there is no grief, much less fear. (212)
5. Grief arises from attachment; fear arises from attachment. For someone who is wholly free from attachment, there is no grief, much less fear. (214)
6. Grief arises from lust; fear arises from lust. For someone who is wholly free from lust, there is no grief, much less fear. (215)
7. Grief arises from craving; fear arises from craving. For someone who is wholly free from craving, there is no grief, much less fear. (216)
8. Whoever has virtue and insight, and cultivates with Dharma realizes the Truths and fulfils his own duties - all people hold dear to him. (217)
9. He who has developed a wish for the infinite Nirvana, whose mind is thrilled (with the three fruits of sagehood), whose mind is not bound by material pleasures, such a person is called "uddham-soto" (he who goes upstream). (218)
10. A man long absent from home returns safely from afar, his kinsman, friends and well wishers rejoice at his return. (219)
11. Likewise, when one who has done good is gone from this world to the next, his good deeds receive him, like relatives receiving a returning loved one. (220)

Chapter 17 Anger
1. One should give up anger. One should abandon pride. One should overcome all fetters. Sorrow cannot touch one who does not cling to mind and body, and is thus passionless. (221)
2. Whoever controls his rising anger just as a charioteer controls his chariot at full speed is called a true charioteer; others merely hold the reins. (222)
3. Conquer anger by love. Conquer evil by good. Conquer the mean by generosity. Conquer the liar by truth. (223)
4. One should utter the truth. One should not be angry. One should give what one can to him who asks. Along these three paths, one may go to the presence of the gods. (224)
5. Those sages do not hurt others, and keep their body under self-control. They go to the immortal Nirvana, where once gone they never grieve. (225)
6. Those who are ever vigilant, who discipline themselves day and night, who are wholly intent on Nirvana, their defilements are destroyed. (226)
7. O Atula, this is an old saying, it is not a saying of today: "They blame those who sit silent; they blame those who speak too much; they blame those who speak too little." No one is not blamed in this world. (227)
8. There never was, there never will be nor in there now, a man who is wholly blamed and wholly praised. (228)
9. Examining day by day, the wise praises one whose life is pure, who is intelligent, endowed with knowledge and virtue. (224)
10. One who is pure as a piece of refined gold of the Jambu River, is praised by the gods, even by Brahman. (230)
11. One should guard against misdeeds (caused by) body, and let the body be self-controlled. Giving up evil conduct in body, but be of good conduct in body. (231)
12. One should guard against misdeeds (caused by) speech, and let the speech be self-controlled. Giving up evil conduct in speech, but be of good conduct in speech. (232)
13. One should guard against misdeeds (caused by) mind, and let mind be self-controlled. Giving up evil conduct in mind, but be of good conduct in mind. (233)
14. The wise who are restrained in deed and speech are self-controlled. Those who are restrained in mind are indeed perfectly restrained. (234)

Chapter 18 Impurities
1. You are like a withered leaf now. The messenger of death is waiting for you. You stand on the starting point of decay. There is no provision for you too. (235)
2. Make an island for yourself. Strive quickly. Be wise. Purged of stain and free from passions, you will enter the heavenly stage of Ariyas. (236)
3. Your life has come to an end now. You are setting out to the presence of death. There is no halting place for you by the way. There is no provision for you too. (237)
4. Make an island for yourself. Strive without delay. Be wise. Purged of stain and free from passions, you will not come again to birth and old age. (238)
5. Let a wise person remove his own impurities by degrees, little by little, from time to time, just as a silversmith removes the impurities from silver. (239)
6. Even as rust sprung from iron, a man's own impure transgressions lead him to the evil path. (240)
7. Non-recitation is the rust of incantation; non-exertion is the rust of houses; sloth is the rust of beauty; carelessness is the rust of the watcher. (241)
8. Misconduct is the taint of a woman. Meanness is the taint of a donor. Taints, indeed, are all evil deeds both in this world and in the next. (242)
9. Ignorance is the worse taint and the greatest taint. Abandoning this taint, O Bhikhus, be taintless. (243)
10. Life seems easy for one who is shameless, impudent as a crow, back-biting, presumptuous, arrogant and corrupt. (244)
11. Life seems hard for one who ever seeks purity, is detached and humble, is pure and reflective. (245)
12-13. Whoever destroys life in this world, tells lies, takes what is not given, goes to others' wives, and is addicted to intoxicating drinks, digs up his own root in this world. (246-247)
14. Knowing this, therefore, O man, "Difficulty in self-control is evil". Let greed curd wickedness, not drag you to protracted misery. (248)
15. People give offerings according to their faith and as they are pleased. Whoever therein is envious of others' food and drink gains no peace either by day or by night. (249)
16. But whoever fully cuts off uprooted and destroys this feeling, gains peace by day and by night. (250)
17. There is no fire like lust, no grip like hate, no net like delusion, no river like craving. (251)
18. It is easy to see other's faults, but hard indeed, to see one's own. One shows the others faults like chaff winnowed in the wind, but one hides one's own faults as a cunning hunter conceals himself by camouflage. (252)
19. If a man sees others' faults, and ever thinks of their faults, his corruption grows. He is far from the destruction of corruption. (253)
20. In the sky, there is no track, there is no saint to find the path outside. Mankind delights in obstacles, but Tathgatas are free from obstacles. (254)
21. In the sky, there is no track. There is no saint to find the path outside. There are no conditional things that are eternal. There is no instability in the Buddhas. (255)

Chapter 19 The Righteousness
1. He is not thereby righteous because he arbitrates cases hastily. The wise man should investigate what is right and what is wrong. (256)
2. The intelligent person who leads others not falsely, but lawfully and impartially. He is a guardian of the law, and is called one who abides by the law. (257)
3. One is not a learned man merely because one speaks much. One who is secure, without hate and fearless is called "learned". (258)
4. One is not versed in Dharma merely because one speaks too much. One who hears little and sees the Dharmas mentally and who does not neglect the Dharma is, indeed, versed in the Dharma. (259)
5. One is not an elder merely because of his gray hair on one's head. A man is called "old-in-vain" if he is old only in his age. (260)
6. A wise man is a venerable "elder", if he is in truth, virtue, harmlessness, self-controlled, and purged of impurities. (261)
7. Not by mere eloquence, nor by handsome appearance can a man be a man, who becomes good-natured, if he is jealous, selfish and deceitful. (262)
8. But he in whom these are wholly cut off, uprooted and extinct, who is wise and purged of hatred, is called good-natured. (263)
9. Not by a shaven head, does an undisciplined man who utters lies becomes a monk. How will one who is full of desire and greed be a monk. (264)
10. He who wholly subdues evil deeds both small and grot, is called a monk because he has overcome all evil. (265)
11. He is not thereby a Bhiksu merely because he begs from others. By following the entire code (of morality), one certainly becomes a Bhiksu and not (merely) by such begging. (266)
12. Herein he who transcends both good and evil, whose conduct is sublime, who lives with understanding in this world, he is indeed called a Bhiksu. (267)
13. Not by silence (alone) does a man who is dull and ignorance becomes a sage. That wise man who, as if holding a pair of scales, embraces the best and shuns evil, is indeed a sage. (268)
14. For that reason he is a sage. He who understands the two worlds is therefore called a sage. (269)
15. He is not an Ariya (Noble) in that he harms living beings. Through his harmlessness towards all living beings, he is called an Ariya (Noble) (270)
16-17. Not only by mere morality and austerities nor again by much learning, nor even by developing mental concentration, nor by secluded lodging, nor (thinking) "I enjoy the bliss of renunciation, not resorted by the worldly matter, should you, O Bhiksu, be contented without reaching the extinction of corruption. (271-272)

Chapter 20 The Path
1. The best of the path is the Eightfold Paths. The best of truth are the Four Noble Truths. Non-attachment is the best of states. The one who sees is the best of bipeds. (273)
2. This is the only path. There is no other path for the purity of vision. Do follow this path. You will confuse Mara. (274)
3. Entering upon that path, you will travel to the end of pain. Having learnt to remove the thorns, I have taught you the path. (275)
4. It is you who must make the effort. The Tathagatas are the only teachers. The meditative ones, who enter the path, are delivered from the bonds of Mara. (276)
5. "All conditional things are transient." When one discerns this with wisdom, one is disgusted with suffering. This is the path to purity. (277)
6. "All conditioned things are sorrowful". When one discerns this with wisdom, one is disgusted with suffering. This is the path to purity. (278)
7. "All Dharmas are without a soul". When one discerns this with wisdom, one is disgusted with suffering. This is the path to purity. (279)
8. Though young and strong, a man does not strive when he should strive, he sinks into the idleness and lack of determination. He will never realized the path by wisdom as his (good) thoughts are depressed. (280)
9. A man should be aware of his speech and mind, and should not do any harm with his body. Let him purify these three ways of action and win the path realized by the sages. (281)
10. Certainly, spiritual Yoga (meditation) leads to light (wisdom). Lack of Yoga leads to darkness. Considering this twofold paths of gain and loss, let the wise man conduct himself on the path that leads to light. (282)
11. Cut down the forest (of the passions), not only real trees. Fear and danger arises from the forest. Cutting down both forest and brushwood (of the passions), O Bhiksu, be free from the forest. (283)
12. As long as the slightest brushwood (of the passions) of a man towards women is not cut down, so long the mind of a man is in bondage, he is bowed like a calf tied to a cow. (284)
13. Cut off your affection, as though it were an autumn lily, with the hand. Cultivate the very path of peace. Nirvana has been expounded by the Auspicious One (the Buddha) (285)
14. "Here shall I live in the rainy seasons, here in autumn and in summer", the fool thinks, but he doesn't realize the danger (of death). (286)
15. The man whose mind is set on his children and herds, is seized and carried away by death, even as a great flood (sweeps away) a sleeping village. (287)
16. There is no protection for the children; neither fathers nor even kinsmen. For one who is overcome by death, no protection is to be found among kinsmen. (288)
17. Realize this fact, let the virtuous and wise person swiftly clear the way that leads to Nirvana. (289)

Chapter 21 Miscellaneous
1. If by giving up a lesser happiness, one may behold a greater one, let the wise man give up the lesser happiness in consideration of the greater happiness. (290)
2. He who seeks happiness for himself by causing unhappiness to others is not released in the chains of hatred. He is entangled himself in the tangles of hatred. (291)
3. What should have been done is left undone, what should not have been done is done. Of those who are arrogant and thoughtless, their corruption increases. (292)
4. Those who always earnestly practice "mindfulness of the body", who follow not what should not be done, and constantly do what should be done, of those mindful and refection ones, the corruption comes to an end. (293)
5. Having slain mother (craving) and father (conceit) and two warrior kings (views based on eternalism and nihilism) and having destroyed a country (sense-avenues and sense-objects), together with its revenue officer (attachment), a Brahma (Arhat) goes without grievance. (294)
6. Having slain mother (craving) and father (conceit) and two Brahma kinds (views based on eternalism and nihilism), and having destroyed the perilous path (hindrances), a Braham (Arhat) goes without grievance. (295)
7. Well awakened the disciples of Buddha Gotama ever arise -- those who always contemplate the Buddha by day and night. (296)
8. Well awakened the disciples of Buddha Gotama ever arise -- those who always contemplate the Dharma by day and night. (296)
9. Well awakened the disciples of Buddha Gotama ever arise -- those who always contemplate the Sangha by day and night. (297)
10. Well awakened the disciples of Buddha Gotama ever arise -- those who always contemplate the body by day and night. (298)
11. Well awakened the disciples of Buddha Gotama ever arise -- those are delighted in harmlessness by day and night. (300)
12. Well awakened the disciples of Buddha Gotama ever arise -- those are delighted in meditation by day and night. (301)
13. It is difficult to renounce therein it is difficult to delight. It is difficult and painful to be in household life. It is painful to associate with those who are incompatible. The long road of Samsara (transmigration) is a road of pain for travellers. Therefore, do not be a traveller or a pursuer of pain. (302)
14. He who is full of confidence and virtue, and possessed of fame and wealth, is honored everywhere, in whatever place he goes. (302)
15. The good reveal themselves from afar, like the Himalaya Mountains, but the wicked are invisible though near, like arrows shot at night. (304)
16. He who sits alone, rests alone, walks alone, works hard, who controls himself in solitude, will find delight in the forest. (305)

Chapter 22 Woeful State
1. One who does not speak the truth goes to a woeful state, and so is one who says he has not done what he knows well he has done. Both become equal after death, people of base action in the other world. (306)
2. Many wear the yellow robe on their necks, whose life is not pure and who have no self-control. Those evil men through their evil deeds are reborn in a woeful state. (307)
3. It is better to swallow a red-hot iron ball (which would consume one) like a flame of fire, than to be an immoral and uncontrolled person feeding on the alms offered by people. (308)
4. Four misfortunes happen to the wreckless man who commits adultery, degradation of merit, disturbed sleep, blame and going to a woeful state. (309)
5. There is degradation of merit, as well as evil destiny. Brief is the joy of the frightened man and woman. The king imposes a heavy punishment. Hence no man should go after another man's wife. (310)
6. Just as a hand of Kusa grass if badly grasped will cut one's hand, the life of a monk, if wrongly handled, drags him to a woeful state. (311)
7. For when acts of devotion are loosely performed, when sacred vows are broken, and when holy life is not pure, no great fruits can come from such a life. (312)
8. When one has something to do, let one do it. Let one promote it steadily. A slack asceticism only scatters dust all the more. (313)
9. It is better not to do an evil deed. A misdeed torments one hereafter. It is better to do a good deed. One does not grieve after doing it. (314)
10. Guard yourself, like guarding a border city within and without. Do not let this opportunity slip. They who let the opportunity slip will grieve when they are born in a woeful state. (315)
11. Beings who are ashamed of what is not shameful, and are not ashamed of what is shameful, embrace false views and go to a woeful state. (316)
12. Beings who see fear in what is not to be feared and see no fear in the fearsome, embrace false views and go to a woeful state. (317)
13. Beings who imagine that wrong is right, and who perceive that right is wrong, embrace false views and go to a woeful state. (318)
14. Beings who know what is wrong as wrong, and what is right as right, embrace right views and go to a blissful state. (319)

Chapter 23 Elephant
1. I will endure abuse as an elephant endures arrows from a bow in the battlefield. Certainly most people are not disciplined. (320)
2. They lead the trained (horses or elephants) to an assembly. The king mounts the trained animal. The trained ones who endure abuse are the best among men. (321)
3. Trained mules are excellent, so are noble horses of Sindh, and royal tusked elephant; but far better is one who has trained oneself. (322)
4. For it is surely with those vehicles that a man will reach the land unknown. Nirvana is reached by the man who is controlled through his subdued and well-trained by himself. (323)
5. An elephant named Dhanapalaka is hard to control with pungent juice flowing. However, it eats no food when it thinks of the elephant forest. (324)
6. The stupid one who is lazy and gluttonous, who eats large meals and rolls in sleep, and who lies like a pig nourished on pig-wash, goes to rebirth again and again. (325)
7. In the past, this mind went wandering where it liked, as it wished and as it listed. Today, I shall completely hold this mind in check, with attention, as a wild elephant controlled by the trainer. (326)
8. Take delight in heedfulness. Guard your mind well. Draw yourselves out of the evil way as the elephant draws himself out of a muddy swamp. (327)
9. If you get a prudent companion (who is suitable) to live with you, who behaves well and is wise, you should live with him joyfully and mindfully, overcoming all dangers. (328)
10. If you do not get a prudent companion (who is suitable) to live with you, who behaves well and is wise, then like a king who leaves a conquered kingdow, you should live alone as an elephant does in the elephant forest. (329)
11. It is better to live alone. There is no fellowship with the ignorant. Let one live alone doing no evil, care-free, like an elephant in the elephant forest. (330)
12. It is pleasant to have friends whenever needed. It is pleasant to be content with just this and that. It is pleasant to have merit when life is at an end. It is pleasant to surrender all ill. (331)
13. It is pleasant to minister to mother in this world. It is pleasant to minister to father in this world too. It is pleasant to minister to ascetics. It is pleasant to minister to the Nobles ones too.(332)
14. It is pleasant to have virtue (continued) until old age. It is pleasant to be pure and firm in faith. It is pleasant to attain wisdom. It is pleasant to do no evil. (333)

Chapter 24 Cravings
1. The craving of the person addicted to careless living grows like a creeper. He jumps from one life to another, like a fruit-loving monkey in the forest (from one tree without fruit to another). (334)
2. And when his craving overcomes him, his sorrows flourish like the entangling creeper called Birana grass. (335)
3. And whoever overcomes his selfish craving in the world, his sorrows fall away from him, like drops of water from a lotus flower. (336)
4. This I say to you. Good luck to you all who have assembled here! Dig up the root of craving like one in quest of sweet root of Birana grass. Let not Mara crush you again and again as a flood (crushes) a reed. (337)
5. Just as a tree, though cut down, can grow again if its roots are undamaged and strong. In the same way if the latent craving are not wholly uprooted, sorrows will spring up again and again. (338)
6. When the thirty-six streams (of craving) that run towards pleasures are strong, the torrential thoughts of lust carry away that deluded person. (339)
7. The streams (craving) flow everywhere. The creeper (craving) grows and stands everywhere. If you see the creeper grow, cut off its roots with wisdom. (340)
8. Beings whose sensuous pleasures arise are steeped in craving. Bound for happiness, they seek happiness. Certainly, such men come to birth and old age. (341)
9. People who are interested in craving are terrified like a hunted hare. Held in fetters and in bonds, they suffer again and again. (342)
10. People who are interested in craving are terrified like a hunted hare. Therefore, a Bhiksu who wishes his own passionlessness (Nirvana) should discard carving. (343)
11. Whoever with no desire (for the household) find pleasures in the forest (in solitude), and though freed from desire (for the household), one runs back to that very home. Come, behold that man. He is free, but runs back into that very bondage. (344)
12. The wise do not say a strong bond that is made of iron, wood or rope; much stronger is the bond (attachment) of passion for jewels, ornaments, children and wives. (345)
13. The wise say this is indeed a strong bond. It seems soft to hurl down, but it drags a man, and it is hard to loosen. The wise cut off this and leave the world, without craving and renounce sensual pleasures. (346)
14. Those who are infatuated with passion fall back into the stream. Just as a spider spuns into the web by itself. The wise cut off this too, and wander without craving, and are released from all sorrow. (347)
15. Let go the past. Let go the future. Let go the present. Crossing to the far then shore of existence, you should release completely in mind and do not undergo birth and old age again. (348)
16. The man who is disturbed by evil thoughts, who is exceedingly lustful, and who contemplates sensual pleasures an d increases his craving desires makes the bond (of Mara) stronger certainly. (349)
17. But he who delights in subduing evil thoughts, who meditates on "the sorrows of pleasure", and who is mindful, makes an end (of craving) and severs Mara's bond. (350)
18. Having reached the goal, a man is fearless, without craving and passionless. He has cut off the thorns of life. This is his final body. (351)
19. He who is without craving and grasping, who is skilled in etymology and terminology and who knows the grouping of letters and their sequence, is called the bearer of the final body, a great man of profound wisdom. (352)
20. I have overcome everything. I know everything. I am detached from everything. I have renounced everything. I am wholly, and absorbed in "The destruction of craving". Having comprehended all by myself, whom shall I call my teacher. (353)
21. The gift of Truth excels all other gifts. The flavor of Truth excels all other flavors. The pleasure in Truth excels all other pleasures. Having destroyed craving. He overcomes all sorrow. (354)
22. Wealth can ruin the fool, but not those who seek the beyond (Nirvana). The ignorant man ruins himself through craving for wealth as (if he were ruining) others. (355)
23. Weeds harm the fields. Lust harms mankind. Hence, what is given to those lustless yields abundant fruit. (356)
24. Weeds harm the fields. Hatred harms mankind. Hence, what is given to those rid of hatred yields abundant fruit. (357)
25. Weeds harm the fields. Hatred harms mankind. Delusion, what is given to those rid of delusion yields abundant fruit. (358)
26. Weeds harm the fields. Hatred harms mankind. Craving, what is given to those rid of craving yields abundant fruit. (359)

Chapter 25 The Bhiksu
1. Good is the control of the eye; good is the control of the ear; good is the control of the nose; good is the control of the tongue. (360)
2. Good is the control of the body; good is the control of the speech; good is the control of the mind; good is the control of everything. Restrained at all points, the Bhiksu is freed from sorrow. (361)
3. He who is controlled in hand, in foot, in speech, and in the lightest (i.e. the head); he who delights in meditation, and is composed; he who is alone, and is contented, is called a Bhiksu. (362)
4. A Bhiksu who is controlled in tongue, who speaks wisely, who is humble, who explains the meaning and the text - sweet is his speech. (363)
5. That Bhiksu who dwells in Dharma, who delights in Dharma, who meditates in Dharma, and who well remembers Dharma, does not fall away from the Sublime Dharma. (364)
6. Let him not despise the offerings given to him, and let him not be envious of others. The Bhiksu who envies others does not attain Samadhi (i.e. concentration). (365)
7. If a Bhiksu does not despise what he receives, though receiving but little, even the gods praise him whose life is pure and full of endeavor. (366)
8. He who has no thought of "I" and "mine" whatever towards mind and body, he who grieves not for that which he has not, he is indeed called a Bhiksu. (367)
9. The Bhiksu who abides in loving-kindness, who is pleased with the Buddha's teaching, attains to that state of peace and happiness, where the conditioned things has ceased. (368)
10. Empty this boat of your life, O Bhiksu! Empty it, you will move swiftly. Cutting off lust and hated, you will thereby go to Nirvana. (369)
11. Cut off the five - self-illusion, doubts, indulgence in wrongful rites and ceremonies, sensuous desire and hatred! Give up five - attachment to the Realm of Form, attachment to the Formless Realms, conceit, restlessness and ignorance. Further cultivate five - confidence, heedfulness, effort, concentration and wisdom. The Bhiksu who has gone beyond the five bonds (i.e. lust, hate, delusion, pride, false views) is called "Flood-crosser". (370)
12. Meditate, O Bhiksu. Be mindful. Do not let your mind whirl on sensual pleasures. Do not be careless and swallow a ball of lead, just as not crying "This is sorrow" when burnt. (371)
13. There is no concentration in one who lacks wisdom, nor is there wisdom in him who lacks concentration; but he who has both concentration and wisdom, is in the presence of Nirvana. (372)
14. The Bhiksu who has retired to a lonely abode, who has calmed his mind, and who perceives the doctrine clearly, experiences a joy transcending that of man. (373)
15. Whenever he reflects on the rise and fall of the Skandhas (Aggregates), he experiences joy and happiness of those who know that Nirvana is immortal. (374)
16. This becomes the beginning for a wise Bhiksu: sense-control, contentment, restrained with regard to the fundamental Disciplinary Code, association with beneficent and energetic friends whose livelihood is pure. (375)
17. Let him be cordial in his ways and refined in conduct; and be filled thereby with joy, he will make an end of sorrow. (376)
18. Even as the jasmine creeper sheds its withered flowers, you, O Bhiksu, should totally cast off lust and hatred. (377)
19. The Bhiksu who is calm in body, calm in speech and calm in mind, who is master of himself and who has left out worldly things, is truly called a "peaceful one". (378)
20. Do censure yourself. Do examine yourself. Self-guarded and mindful, O Bhiksu, you will live happily. (379)
21. You are indeed, the protector of yourself. You are, indeed, your own refuge. Therefore, control your own self as a merchant controls a noble horse. (380)
22. It is full of joy and confidence in the Buddha's teaching. The Bhiksu will attain the blissful peaceful state, where the conditioned things has ceased. (381)
23. The Bhiksu who devotes himself to the Buddha's teaching when he is still young, illuminates this world, like the moon freed from clouds. (382)

Chapter 26 The Brahmin
1. Strive and go beyond the stream. O Brahmin, discard the sense-desires. Knowing the destruction of conditioned things, O Brahmin, be a knower of Nirvana (which is not made of anything). (383)
2. In two states (of concentration and insight), when a Brahmin goes to the Further Shore, all the fetters of that "one who knows" are broken. (384)
3. He for whom there is neither this nor the Further Shore, nor both who is undistressed and unbound - I call him a Brahmin. (385)
4. He who is meditative, stainless and secluded, he who has done his duty and is free from corruptions, he who has attained the supreme Goal (Nirvana) - I call him a Brahmin. (386)
5. The sun shines by day; the moon is radiant by night. The warrior shines in his armor. The Brahmin shines in his meditation. But the Buddha shines in glory all day and night. (387)
6. He is called a Brahmin because he has discarded evil, and because he lives in peace. He is called a Samanera because he gives up the impurities; he is called a Pabbajita, a pilgrim. (388)
7. One should never hurt a Brahmin, nor as Brahmin should vent (his wrath) on one who has hurt him. Shame on him who hurt a Brahmin! More shame on him who gives vent (to his wrath)! (389)
8. Unto a Brahmin that (non-retaliation) is of no small advantage. If he holds back his mind from dear things, whenever the intent to harm ceases, then and then sorrow subsides. (390)
9. He who does no evil through body, speech or mind and who is restrained in these three respects - I call him a Brahmin. (391)
10. If one understands the doctrine preached by the fully enlightened one from anybody, one should reverence him devoutly, even as a Braham reveres the sacrificial-fire. (392)
11. Not by matted hair, nor by family, nor by birth that one becomes a Brahmin. But in whom there exist both truth and righteousness, he is pure, he is a Brahmin. (393)
12. What is the use of your matted hair, foolish man, and what is the use of your antelope skin garment, if you are full of passions within yourself and without adorning yourself. (394)
13. The person who wears worn-out robes, who is lean, whose veins stand out, who meditates alone in the forest - I call him a Brahmin. (395)
14. I do not call him a Brahmin merely because he is born of a (Brahmin) womb or sprung from a (Brahmin) mother. He is merely a "Dear-addresser", if he has impediments. He who is free from impediments, free from clinging - I call him a Brahmin. (396)
15. He who has cut off all fetters, who does not tremble, who has gone beyond ties, who is unbound - I call him a Brahmin. (397)
16. He who has cut the strap (hatred), the thong (craving), and the rope (heresy), together with all their fastenings (latest tendencies), who has thrown up the cross-bar (ignorance), who is enlightened (Buddha) - I call him a Brahmin. (398)
17. He who, though innocent, endures reproach, flogging and punishments, without anger, whose power and the potent army is patience - I call him a Brahmin. (399)
18. He who is free from anger, but is faithful, virtuous, free from craving, self-controlled and bears his final body - I call him a Brahmin. (400)
19. Like water on a lotus leaf, like a mustard seed on the point of a needle, he who does not cling to sensual pleasures - I call him a Brahmin. (401)
20. He who realize the destruction of his sorrow here in this world, who has laid the burden aside and is emancipated - I call him a Brahmin. (402)
21. He whose knowledge is deep, who is wise, who is skilled in the right and wrong way, who has reached the supreme goal (Nirvana) - I call him a Brahmin. (403)
22. He who is no intimate either with house-holders or with the homeless ones, who wanders without an abode, who has no desires - I call him a Brahmin. (404)
23. He who has laid aside the cudgel in dealing with beings, whether feeble or strong, who neither harms nor kills - I call him a Brahmin. (405)
24. He who is friendly amongst the hostile, who is peaceful amongst the violent, who is unattached amongst the attached - I call him a Brahmin. (406)
25. He from whom lust, hatred, pride and detraction are fallen off, like a mustard seed from the point of a needle - I call him a Brahmin. (407)
26. He who speak gently, with instructive and true words, who gives offence to nobody in his speech - I call him a Brahmin. (408)
27. He who takes nothing that is not given in this world, whether it is long or short, small or great, fair or foul - I call him a Brahmin. (409)
28. He who has no craving desires, pertaining to this world or to the next, who is free from desires and emancipated - I call him a Brahmin. (410)
29. He who has no craving desires, is free from doubts through his knowledge, has gained a firm footing in the Deathless (Nirvana) - I call him a Brahmin. (411)
30. Herein he who has transcended both good and bad, and the ties (of lust, hatred, delusion, pride and false views) as well, who is pure, free from sorrow, free from stain - I call him a Brahmin. (412)
31. He who is spotless as the moon, who is pure, serene and unperturbed, who has destroyed craving for becoming - I call him a Brahmin. (413)
32. He who has gone beyond the lust, and illusion in the difficult path (of transmigration), and has crossed the ocean of life (of Samsara), who is meditative, free from craving and doubts, who clings to nothing, who has attained Nirvana - I call him a Brahmin. (414)
33. He who gives up sense-desires in this world, renounces worldly life and become a homeless one, has destroyed sense-desires and becoming - I call him a Brahmin. (415)
34. He who gives up craving in this world, renounces worldly life and become a homeless one, has destroyed craving and becoming - I call him a Brahmin. (416)
35. He who discards human ties and transcends celestial ties, is completely delivered from all ties - I call him a Brahmin. (417)
36. He who has given up likes and dislikes, who is cooled and is without defilements, who has conquered the world (of Aggregates), and is strenuous - I call him a Brahmin. (418)
37. He who knows the death and rebirth of beings in every way, who is non-attached, well gone (in practice to Nirvana) and enlightened - I call him a Brahmin. (419)
38. He whose destiny neither gods nor Gandhabhas, nor men know, who has destroyed all corruption, and is far removed from passion (Arhat) - I call him a Brahmin. (420)
39. He who has no clinging to Aggregates that are past, future or present, who is without clinging and grasping - I call him a Brahmin. (421)
40. The fearless one, the noble, the hero, the great sage, the conqueror, the desireless, the cleanser (of defilements), the enlightened - I called him a Brahmin. (422)
41. That sage who knows his former abodes, who sees the blissful and woeful states, who has reached the end of births, who has perfected himself with superior wisdom, who has completed (the holy life) and reached the end of all passions - I call him a Brahmin. (423)
-The End-

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