Buddhist painting by Venerable ManBong


honeydew buddhist wall painting 甘露幀

Goryeo’s pattern 高麗文樣

Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva 金泥彩色觀音

Paradise picture 極樂圖

chrysograph Avalokitesvara;金泥觀音

chrysograph Avalokitesvara 金泥觀音

chrysograph Avalokitesvara 金泥觀音

chrysograph Avalokitesvara 金泥觀音

chrysograph Avalokitesvara 金泥觀音

Arhat pictures 羅漢圖

Bosal-Do 菩薩圖

Fenghuang Dancheong 鳳凰丹靑

Fenghuang picture 鳳凰圖

sangdan Tanghwa 上壇幀

a rabbit 十二支神像

a hen 十二支神像

Arhat;section drawing 羅漢部分圖

Arhat section drawing 羅漢部分圖

twin dragons 雙龍

twin dragons 雙龍

Yonglakdo 瓔珞圖

Yeongsanhoesang-do 靈山會相圖

Arhat;drawing 羅漢圖

Arhat;section drawing羅漢部分圖

Arhat;section drawing 羅漢部分圖


white porcelain 靑華白磁

white porcelain 靑華白磁

white porcelain 靑華白磁

7 stars buddhist wall painting 七星幀

Avalokitesvara sea 海上觀音

Avalokitesvara sea 海上觀音

Avalokitesvara sea 海上觀音

Avalokitesvara sea 海上觀音

Avalokitesvara sea 海上觀音

Avalokitesvara sea 海上觀音

Avalokitesvara sea 海上觀音

Avalokitesvara sea 海上觀音

Avalokitesvara sea 海上觀音

Avalokitesvara sea 海上觀音

Arhat 十六羅漢

Arhat 十六羅漢

Arhat 十六羅漢

Arhat 十六羅漢

Venerable ManBong

Korea takes pride in the preservation of its culture, and the government in recognition of its rich heritage officially designates certain people and places as national treasures. At 77, Lee Man Bong is Living Treasure of Korea No. 48 and one of his country’s masters of Buddhist art.

Lee, a Buddhist monk, whose home is Pomun Temple in Seoul, began his art career influenced by a fortune teller’s prophecy that he would be a Buddhist monk. In 1917, at the age of 7, he joined the T’aego order, one of the two major Korean Buddhist sects. At 16 years of age, he was apprenticed to the venerable Kim Ye Woon who taught him to become an expert in two forms of Korean Buddhist painting, Tanch’ong and T’aenghwa. Today, Lee’s works can be seen at more than 170 of Korea’s Buddhist temples and cultural landmarks throughout the country.

Whereas most painters acquire skills to express individualistic ideas, Lee pursues his art as an act of religious faith. He says, “Each time I pick up a brush, I paint with the heart of a Buddha.” Early this summer, fourteen of his Tanch’ong and T’aenghwa paintings were exhibited at the Korean Cultural Service gallery under the auspices of the Korea Society, the Korean Cultural Service and the Korean Artists Association of Southern California.

Lee, who, with his son, the venerable Lee Yong Woon, presented a slide and lecture presentation on Buddhist painting, says, ” Tanch’ong painting does not express the artist’s world. Rather the inspiration comes from one’s feeling toward the Buddha.”

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